Dunsinane

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Dunsinane

(dʌnˈsɪnən)
n
(Placename) a hill in central Scotland, in the Sidlaw Hills: the ruined fort at its summit is regarded as Macbeth's castle. Height: 308 m (1012 ft)
Usage: The pronunciation (ˈdʌnsɪˌneɪn) is used in Shakespeare's Macbeth for the purposes of rhyme
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dun•si•nane

(ˈdʌn səˌneɪn, ˌdʌn səˈneɪn)

n.
a hill NE of Perth, in central Scotland. 1012 ft. (308 m).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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And while the increasingly tyrannical ruler is bolstered by further phrases from the oracular troika of so-called weird sisters--this time in the form of apparitions boasting that while Macduff is to be feared, 'none of woman born / Shall harm Macbeth' and 'Macbeth shall never vanquish'd be until / Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill / Shall come against him' (2)--a sense of impending doom, of evil deeds leading to an unfortunate end, cannot be shaken.
It is enough to say that Macbeth thinks the second and third prophecies assure him of two things: he cannot be killed ("none of woman born / Shall harm Macbeth" [4.1.102-3]) and he will not lose the crown ("Macbeth shall never vanquish'd be until / Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill / Shall come against him" [114-16]).
(10) The title of the play 'Dunsinane' refers to Dunsinane Hill, mentioned in 4.1.92-4 of Macbeth: 'Macbeth shall never vanquished be, until/Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill/Shall come against him.' It is believed that the battle between MacBethan and MaelColuim took place on this site in 1054.
The forests of Scotland, from the trees surrounding Dunsinane Hill