dutch auction

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Dutch auction

n.
An auction in which an item is initially offered at a high price that is progressively lowered until a bid is made and the item sold.

Dutch auction

n
(Commerce) an auction in which the price is lowered by stages until a buyer is found
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dutch auction - a method of selling in which the price is reduced until a buyer is found
marketing, merchandising, selling - the exchange of goods for an agreed sum of money
Translations

Dutch auction

nasta all'olandese
References in periodicals archive ?
But Is still relies on selling at the Dutch auctions. Bobby Kamani argues that the time is ripe for the industry to follow the tea and coffee sectors and establish its own global auction.
Presently, approximately 50% of all exported flowers are sold through the Dutch Auctions, although direct sales are growing.
Dutch auctions are more often associated with online sales than with stock purchases, but P.A.M.
Since the low bid premiums in Dutch auctions are generally lower than the bid premiums in fixed-price tender offers, Comment and Jarrell (1991) suggest fixed-price tender offers are stronger signals of firm undervaluation.
Contents Dutch Auctions and Reverse Dutch Auctions Quality Differences of Troubled Assets Presents Challenges for Auctions Adverse Selection and Firms' Asset Holdings Reputational Issues and Participation Sequencing Issues Will Auctions Unlock Credit Markets?
In Dutch auctions or uniform price auctions, successful bidders pay only the price of the lowest accepted bid rather than the actual price as in a conventional multiple-price auction.
The English and Dutch auctions work with bidders announcing their bids publicly, and they are therefore known as open (or open-outcry) auctions.
Lateescapes.com is staging 10 Dutch Auctions every day from now until the end of February with a reserve price of just pounds 1 on its holidays to the Balearics.
About five years ago, banking companies weren't doing regular stock buybacks or Dutch auctions, observes Frank Cicero, vice president at Keefe Bruyette & Woods, a New York investment bank that is acting as dealer manager for the Peoples Heritage auction.
During the 1980s, Dutch auctions became a popular alternative to fixed-price tender offers as a means of self-tendering shares of common stock.
Finally, we partition the sample into the two types of RTOs: 1) fixed price and 2) Dutch auction tender offers.