Dwamish


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Dwa·mish

 (dwä′mĭsh)
n.
Variant of Duwamish.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The words of the elders of numerous other tribes--including Blackfoot Hopi Nez Perce Dwamish Cheyenne and Oglala Dakota--also manifest the significance of the Great Spirit in their daily lives--and the stewardship of the Earth that is granted by that Spirit.
A Dwamish chief adds "Every part of this soil is sacred in the estimation of my people ...
Nunca fueron mas actuales las palabras (literales o interpretadas) del "salvaje" jefe Seattle de la tribu de los Dwamish al presidente de los Estados Unidos en 1854: "Como se puede comprar o vender el firmamento, ni aun el calor de la tierra?
"Our religion is the traditions of our ancestors--the dreams of our old men, given them in the solemn hours of night by the Great Spirit; and the visions of our sacred medicine men, and is written in the hearts of our people."--Seattle, Dwamish.
939, 2 KAPPLER 682 (Makah Tribe); 4) Treaty with the Dwamish (Treaty of Point Elliot), Jan.
The words of the elders of numerous other tribes including Blackfoot, Hopi, Nez Perce, Dwamish, Cheyenne, and Oglala Dakota also manifest the significance of the Great Spirit in their daily lives and the stewardship of the Earth that is granted by that Spirit.