dysmorphic

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dysmorphic

(dɪsˈmɔːfɪk)
adj
relating to or resulting in misshapenness of parts of the body
References in periodicals archive ?
After suffering in silence for years, Kadeena is only just starting to speak openly about the disordered eating and body dysmorphia (when a person spends a lot of time worrying about perceived flaws in their appearance) she has suffered for years.
While in the group, she battled with insecurity and body dysmorphia.
The scientists said these behaviors may lead to muscle dysmorphia if they are left unchecked.
Despite her remark, transgenderism or gender identity dysmorphia is widely recognised as a life-long medical condition with no discernible 'cure'.
The TV star opened up about her body dysmorphia in a candid interview, revealing that she wants to return to Loose Women in a bid to tackle her fear of growing older.
That is the message from three Boston University School of Medicine authors writing a commentary for JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery about the growing health threat from "Snapchat dysmorphia," which is a fixation with an imagined or minor flaw in your appearance based on selfies or apps like Snapchat, Instagram, and Facetune.
The people affected by muscle dysmorphia (MD) suffer from a mental disorder in which a distortion of the body image in the form of its underestimation prevails (Pope, Phillips, & Olivardia, 2000), recently this disorder has been introduced as an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in DSM-V (Rodriguez-Testal, Senin-Calderon, & Perona-Garcelan, 2014).
AWELSH MP has opened up about his own teenage battle with body dysmorphia as he spoke of pressure people look thin, healthy and muscular.
In August, a new study by the Boston University of Medicine took the Internet by storm when it revealed that teen patients were requesting doctors to make them look like their heavily filtered selfies on Snapchat - a medical condition plastic surgeons are calling 'Snapchat dysmorphia'.
Doctors say that touch-up apps, such as Facetune, are leading to "Snapchat dysmorphia" in which sufferers concentrate on perceived flaws.
So this week we've all learned a new social media term that is having a very real and worrying effect on us in real life - Snapchat dysmorphia. It's how doctors in the cosmetic surgery industry are describing a new phenomenon that has them seriously worried.
Summary: The trend, labelled 'Snapchat dysmorphia', suggests some people are experiencing a worrying blur between reality and social media