major depressive disorder

(redirected from Dysphoric mood)
Also found in: Medical.

major depressive disorder

or major depression
References in periodicals archive ?
A mental status examination reveals profound psychomotor agitation, dysphoric mood, tearfulness, and mood-congruent delusions.
MBCT posits that individuals who have experienced multiple episodes of recurrent depression are at higher risk for reactivating dysfunctional cognitions when dysphoric mood states occur (Dimidjian et al.
The chief complaint was a three-year history of irritability, dysphoric mood, increased activity level, increased sociability, decreased need for sleep, and delusions of grandiosity.
Repetitive engaging in sexual fantasies, urges or behaviours in response to dysphoric mood states (e.
Although the term 'dysphoria,, in the narrower sense of irritable mood, is often used to designate mood states in different psychopathological conditions (including several personality disorders, affective disorders, organic psychoses, delusional disorders and schizophrenias)--and not only in borderline personality disorder--the quality and the consequences of dysphoric mood in borderlines is rather common.
Do you use the Internet as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.
Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale 2ndEdition (RADS-2) is a brief, self-report measure that includes subscales which evaluate the current level of an adolescent's depressive symptomatology along four basic dimensions of depression: Dysphoric Mood, Anhedonia /Negative Affect, Negative Self-Evaluation, and Somatic Complaints.
Although they can initially increase the sense of alertness, euphoria and concentration, their initial effect is commonly associated with a following irritability, dysphoric mood, difficulty in recalling, disturbed sleep and appetite, as well as tolerance, i.
He reported a severe continuous dysphoric mood that would improve for very short durations following cathinone ingestion.
The notion that memory-questonnaires tap aspects of well-being is shown by its close relationship to dysphoric mood and depressive disorder.
Uses the Internet to escape or relieve a dysphoric mood (such as feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety).
The primary purpose of this study, therefore, was to provide an initial investigation into the possible role that differing levels of experiential avoidance might play in participant responses to experimentally induced dysphoric mood.