Dyula


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Dyula

(diːˈuːlə; ˈdjuːlə)
npl -la or -las
1. (Peoples) a member of a negroid people of W Africa, living chiefly in the rain forests of Côte d'Ivoire, where they farm rice, etc
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Mande branch of the Niger-Congo family
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References in periodicals archive ?
For each phase, all health center managers were informed beforehand via meetings and field officer visits, and the public was informed through media coverage of service activities (posters and flyers, the written press in French, and radio and television advertisements in French) and the local languages (Mossi and Dyula).
The Spread of Dyula and Popular French in Cote d'Ivoire: Implications for Language Policy.
Much as Launay (2006) describes in relation to the ways in which joking relationships were used contingently by Dyula people in Cote d'Ivoire, the fact that Khayelitsha residents described their 'putative' kin in close-kin terms meant that they brought them perceptually close and thereby revealed a culturally constructed hierarchy distinguishing close and distant kin, a hierarchy that was flexible enough to remain unconstrained by the structures of neatly traced genealogies.
Since Adire traders came from faraway places such as Senegal, Dyula in Cameroon, Ghana, Congo, and even all over Nigeria, among others, the Egba traders initially relied on interpreters to translate from English to Yoruba.
formes: dioula, djoula, dyoula, dyula, djula, jula.
Conrad (2004) notes that today, "Mande-speaking peoples include the Maninka of northeastern Guinea and southern Mall, the Bamana of Mall, the Mandinka of Senegambia and Guinea Bissau, and the Dyula of northern Cote d'Ivoire" (p.
Marie Perinbam, "Notes on Dyula Origins and Nomenclature," Bulletin de l'Institut Fondamentale de Recherche de l'Afrique Noire Serie.
Bisa); colonisation between the 15th and 17th centuries, which is that of the Moose, Gulmanceba, Fulbe, Yarse, Marka, Zara; and colonisation at the end of the 17th century, which is that of the Lobi, Dagara, Hausa, Dyula. As a result of these three waves of immigration, the population has been divided into two groups: autochthons or populations previously settled (a group comprising those settled before the 15th century) and people coming from elsewhere (a group composed of populations settled from the 15th century onwards).
"Spirit Media: The Electronic Media and Islam among the Dyula of Northern Cote d'Ivoire." Africa.
Une revolution Dyula, Dakar, IFAN 1968, 1 pp.99, 101, 115.
Person, Samori, une Revolution Dyula, vols 1-3 (Dakar, Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire, 1968).
(1979) 'Landlords, hosts, and strangers among the Dyula', Ethnology 18 (1): 71-83.