Dzhambul


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Dzham·bul

 (jäm-bo͞ol′)
See Taraz.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dzhambul

(Russian dʒamˈbul)
n
(Placename) a former name of Taraz
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dzham•bul

(dʒɑmˈbul, dʒʌm-)

n.
a former name of Aulie Ata.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In 1981, he graduated from the Dzhambul Irrigation, Reclamation and Construction Institute with a degree in irrigation and drainage, in 1991 - from the Almaty Institute of Political Science and Management, majoring in the theory of socio-political relations, in 2002 - from Aulie-Ata University, majoring in law.
In 1981, he graduated from the Dzhambul Irrigation, Reclamation and Construction Institute with a degree in irrigation and drainage, in 1991 from the Almaty Institute of Political Science and Management, majoring in the theory of socio-political relations, in 2002 from Aulie-Ata University, majoring in law.
On January 18, 1963, the Council of Ministers of the Kazakh Republic adopted a special resolution "on measures to improve the economic and living conditions of the citizens arriving from China," which provided the kolkhozes of the Alma-ata, Semipalatinsk, and Dzhambul oblasts with a wide range of resources for the construction of accommodations for the repatriates from China: standard houses with a living area of 12,000 square meters, around 12,000 cubic meters of timber, 6,500 tons of cement, 65,000 square meters of soft roofing material, 1.5 million roofing slates, eight tons of roofing steel, 21,000 square meters of window glass, and 100 tons of nails and other building materials (APRK 1963c).