E-boat

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Related to E-boats: Schnellboot

E-boat

n
(Military) (in World War II) a fast German boat carrying guns and torpedoes
[C20: from enemy boat]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Severely damaged, she was taken under tow by the tug Great Emperor and for four days was attacked by E-boats and bombers as she struggled back to the Tyne at three knots.
But a string of blunders meant hundreds of troops were killed in a friendly fire horror - and the dry run later became a real battle as German E-boats attacked exposed vessels at Lyme Bay.
The troops were killed on April 28 when a Royal Navy convoy carrying them was attacked by E-boats (torpedo boats) from Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine.
It ended tragically when hundreds of Americans drowned as the Allied convoy came under attack by German E-boats.
These were the 8th Zerstorer-Flotille (Z-32, Z-24, ZH-1, formerly the Dutch destroyer Gerard Callenburgh, and the "orphaned" T-24) the 5th Torpedoboot-Flotille (T-28, Mowe, Falke and Jaguar); and the 5th and 9th Schnellboot-Flotillen, equipped with motor torpedo boats (called E-boats by the Allies).
The Government of India has launched the country's first e-boats to reduce rising levels of pollution in the highly congested city of Varanasi.
From there, the vital intelligence was gathered by tracking the movements of the German E-Boats sailing from France.
These little coal laden ships scuttled between the Thames and the North East rivers - never an easy trip, as by day and night they were a target for the Luftwaffe and by the E-boats of the Kriegsmarine.
"We were attacked by dive bombers, U-boats and E-boats would fire torpedoes at us.
The original plan allowed that Force Z would turn back at about 1900 because it would have been foolhardy to have taken Rodney and Nelson (two 1920s battleships with very primitive anti-air and anti-E-boat capabilities) and the carriers Indomitable and Victorious (who did not have a night-fighter capability) into the relatively narrow waters of the Tunisian Straits, which were heavily mined and infested with Italian submarines and Italian and German E-boats, with shore-based enemy aircraft to the northeast and the west.
A flotilla of nine German E-boats had been ordered to investigate unusual radio activity in the area and believed they had stumbled across several destroyers.