carotene

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Related to E160a: E141

carotene

orange fat-soluble pigments found in some plants, such as carrots; vitamin A
Not to be confused with:
keratin – a substance found in the dead outer skin and in horn, hoofs, nails, claws, etc.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

car·o·tene

 (kăr′ə-tēn′) also car·o·tin (-tĭn)
n.
An orange-yellow to red crystalline pigment, C40H56, found in animal tissue and certain plants, such as carrots and squash. It exists in several isomeric forms and is converted to vitamin A in the liver.

[German Karotin, from Latin carōta, carrot; see carrot.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carotene

(ˈkærəˌtiːn) or

carotin

n
(Biochemistry) any of four orange-red isomers of an unsaturated hydrocarbon present in many plants (β-carotene is the orange pigment of carrots) and converted to vitamin A in the liver. Formula: C40H56
[C19 carotin, from Latin carōta carrot; see -ene]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•o•tene

(ˈkær əˌtin)

also car•o•tin

(-tɪn)

n.
any of three yellow or orange fat-soluble pigments having the formula C40H56, found in many plants, esp. carrots, and transformed into vitamin A in the liver; provitamin A.
[1860–65; < Late Latin carōt(a) carrot + -ene]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·o·tene

(kăr′ə-tēn′)
An organic compound that occurs as an orange-yellow to red pigment in many plants and in animal tissue. In animals, it is converted to vitamin A by the liver. Carotenes give plants such as carrots, pumpkins, and dandelions their characteristic color.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carotene - an orange isomer of an unsaturated hydrocarbon found in many plants; is converted into vitamin A in the liver
beta-carotene - an isomer of carotene that is found in dark green and dark yellow fruits and vegetables
provitamin - vitamin precursor; a substance that is converted into a vitamin in animal tissues
2.carotene - yellow or orange-red fat-soluble pigments in plants
carotenoid - any of a class of highly unsaturated yellow to red pigments occurring in plants and animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
karoteen

carotene

[ˈkærətiːn] Ncaroteno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carotene

nKarotin nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

car·o·tene

n. caroteno, pigmento amarillo rojizo presente en vegetales que se convierte en vitamina A en el cuerpo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carotene

n caroteno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unless noted, programming events take place in the designated General Programming Rooms (E150, E160A, E161, E172, Terrace Ballroom) at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.
A widely known misinterpretation of harmless hazards is the case of E160a. A health-conscious but only partially informed consumer notices an "E" on the description of foods, might put it back on the shelf, because such ingredients are generally considered as unhealthy--however E160a signs carotin, a natural component of carrot.
They contain the most fantastic collection of chemicals you're ever likely to come across until you're embalmed - E471, E442, E476, E410 (a particular favourite), E407 and E160a. Terrific.