EBCDIC


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EBCDIC

 (ĕb′sē-dĭk)
n. Computers
A standard code that uses 8 bits to represent each of up to 256 alphanumeric characters.

[E(xtended) B(inary) C(oded) D(ecimal) I(nterchange) C(ode).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

EBCDIC

(ˈɛbsɪˌdɪk)
n acronym for
(Computer Science) extended binary-coded decimal-interchange code: a computer code for representing alphanumeric characters
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
- Undergo EBCDIC to ASCII conversion with deep support for various mainframe sources, formats, and data types
The data is then translated (i.e., EBCDIC [extended binary coded decimal interexchange code] to ASCII) before it's moved to the destination server, where it's loaded onto another database for access and analysis by decision-makers.
Mayo said that usually either the agency doesn't know how to convert it into ASCII or EBCDIC formats that any computer can read or the officials are trying to hide something.
An emulation board converts between the Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) of an IBM mainframe and the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) of the microcomputer, so typically the microcomputer displays the same screen as the airily e terminal.
The most common codes used in the United States are the standard 7-bit American Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) code, and IBM's 8-bit Extended Binary Coded Information Code (EBCDIC), which is based on the original 6-bit binary coded decimal (BCD) code.
With the exception of IBM mainframes, which use an 8-bit encoding scheme called EBCDIC (Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code), ASCII has become the standard for all data communications and computers.
It enables an industry-standard parallel ASCII or EBCDIC printer to be attached to an IBM System 34, 36, 38 or an AS/400.
There are two different coding schemes (ASCII and EBCDIC), at least four different methods of recording information on magnetic tape, and a seemingly endless number of record formats.