electromagnetic spectrum

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electromagnetic spectrum
electromagnetic spectrum frequencies in hertz
A. gamma rays
B. x-rays
C. ultraviolet rays
D. visible light
E. infrared rays
F. microwaves
G. radio waves

electromagnetic spectrum

n.
The entire range of electromagnetic radiation, which includes, in order of increasing frequency and decreasing wavelength, radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, x-rays, and gamma rays.

electromagnetic spectrum

n
(General Physics) the complete range of electromagnetic radiation from the longest radio waves (wavelength 105 metres) to the shortest gamma radiation (wavelength 10–13 metre)

elec′tromagnet′ic spec′trum


n.
the entire continuous spectrum of all forms of electromagnetic radiation, from gamma rays to long radio waves.
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electromagnetic spectrum
The electromagnetic spectrum can be measured in frequencies or in wavelengths. This diagram measures wavelengths in meters, ranging from the longest wavelengths (radio waves) to the shortest (gamma rays). Visible light, which is a band of colors from red to violet, is the only portion of the spectrum that can be seen by the human eye.

electromagnetic spectrum

The entire range of electromagnetic radiation. At one end of the spectrum are gamma rays, which have the shortest wavelengths and high frequencies. At the other end are radio waves, which have the longest wavelengths and low frequencies. Visible light, with intermediate wavelengths and frequencies, is near the center of the spectrum.

electromagnetic spectrum

The range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation from zero to infinity. It is divided into 26 alphabetically designated bands. See also electronic warfare.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electromagnetic spectrum - the entire frequency range of electromagnetic waves
radio frequency - an electromagnetic wave frequency between audio and infrared
extremely low frequency, ELF - below 3 kilohertz
very low frequency, VLF - 3 to 30 kilohertz
LF, low frequency - 30 to 300 kilohertz
medium frequency, MF - 300 to 3000 kilohertz
high frequency, HF - 3 to 30 megahertz
very high frequency, VHF - 30 to 300 megahertz
UHF, ultrahigh frequency - 300 to 3000 megahertz
SHF, superhigh frequency - 3 to 30 gigahertz
EHF, extremely high frequency - 30 to 300 gigahertz
spectrum - an ordered array of the components of an emission or wave
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
gamma radiation, gamma ray - electromagnetic radiation emitted during radioactive decay and having an extremely short wavelength
infrared spectrum - the spectrum of infrared radiation
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
line - a single frequency (or very narrow band) of radiation in a spectrum
microwave - a short electromagnetic wave (longer than infrared but shorter than radio waves); used for radar and microwave ovens and for transmitting telephone, facsimile, video and data
microwave spectrum - the part of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding to microwaves
radio spectrum, radio-frequency spectrum - the entire spectrum of electromagnetic frequencies used for communications; includes frequencies used for radio and radar and television
ultraviolet spectrum - the spectrum of ultraviolet radiation
color spectrum, visible spectrum - the distribution of colors produced when light is dispersed by a prism
References in periodicals archive ?
These components will be combined to produce spectral measurements predominantly in the visible region of the em spectrum.
When a black hole forms you can't see it, but whatever falls into the black hole heats up as it falls, throwing off detectable radiation all over the EM spectrum.
A military action that involves the use of electromagnetic (EM) emission and directs energy to gain control over the EM spectrum (EMS) or to assail the enemy can be termed as Electronic Warfare (EW).
The levels of reflectance in different parts of the EM spectrum can be quantified mathematically and manipulated using image processing software to detect patterns of healthy and unhealthy vegetation.
Meanwhile, the number of users in the EM spectrum has grown dramatically over the last two decades.
The EM spectrum (for this purpose, the EM spectrum is usable radio frequencies and other frequencies used for transmission of data, such as laser communication) is the means by which we and our adversaries attempt to transmit information and command forces.
5 [micro]m) region of the EM spectrum are characterized by absorption features, caused primarily by electronic transitions and vibrational transitions [21].
EMI can occur throughout the EM spectrum from 0 Hz to 20 GHz or higher frequencies.
The best place to start is with a discussion of the EM spectrum and its related component, sound.
The EM Spectrum resources must be as intensively managed as fuel, ammo or any of the other commander's warfighting resources.
7) This definition implied that cyberspace is broader than the EM spectrum alone and involves the use of data and hardware that channel EM energy to create an information environment.
As more analysts become accustomed to the usefulness of the entire EM spectrum, GEOINT will evolve from imagery interpretation to material analysis, and all data will possess geospatial metadata for quick referencing within a common operating picture.