lidocaine

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Related to EMLA: Emla cream

li·do·caine

 (lī′də-kān′)
n.
A synthetic amide, C14H22N2O, used chiefly in the form of its hydrochloride as a local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic agent.

[(acetani)lid(e), a toxic compound formerly used as an analgesic and antipyretic (acet(o)- + anil(ine) + -ide) + -caine.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lidocaine

(ˈlaɪdəˌkeɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) a powerful local anaesthetic administered by injection, or topically to mucous membranes. Formula: C14H22N2O.HCl.H2O. Also called: lignocaine
[C20: from (acetani)lid(e) + -caine on the model of cocaine]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

li•do•caine

(ˈlaɪ dəˌkeɪn)

n.
a synthetic crystalline powder, C14H22N2O, used in the form of its hydrochloride as a local anesthetic and to treat certain arrhythmias.
[(acetani) lid (e) + -o- + -caine, extracted from cocaine (to designate an anesthetic)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lidocaine - a local anesthetic (trade names Lidocaine and Xylocaine) used topically on the skin and mucous membranes
local anaesthetic, local anesthetic, topical anaesthetic, topical anesthetic, local - anesthetic that numbs a particular area of the body
brand, brand name, marque, trade name - a name given to a product or service
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lidocaine

n. lidocaína, anestésico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lidocaine

n lidocaína; viscous — lidocaína viscosa
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
muris from May 30, 2016, through October 1, 2017, we used a Taqman real-time PCR to test 8,760 ticks for EMLA, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, B.
The Effectiveness of Oral Sucrose And Topikal Emla Application In Reducing Neonatal Pain During Venepunture.
This research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of music listening intervention for alleviating pain among children in comparison to the use of the EMLA cream, a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (26).
have compared the administration of vapocoolant spray, EMLA cream, and placebo cream during venous cannulation among patients undergoing hemodialysis.
18 September 2017 - UK-based drugmaker AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN) has entered into an agreement with Mauritius-based Aspen Group's Aspen Global Inc business under which AGI will now acquire the residual rights to the established anaesthetic medicines comprising of Diprivan, EMLA,Xylocaine/Xylocard/Xyloproct, Marcaine, Naropin, Carbocaine and Citanest, the company said.
Table 1 Summary of injection technique, HA filler type, volume, initial duration, requirement for repeat injections or hyaluronidase and Author Product Technique Mancini et al (3) Restylane Topical EMLA, 30-gauge 2009 Juvederm Ultra needle, feathered layered N=10 approach, deep to orbicularis, upper lid pretarsal-pre levator region 10-20 units per lid Martin-Oviedo et al Restylane Topical ethyl chloride, lower (4) 2013 N=26 to upper lid, deep to orbicularis, pretarsal region, avoiding upper canaliculus.
for the commercial manufacture and delivery of Emla Patch to Japan.
(1) Intervention groups received 0.25 to 10 mL (median, 2 mL) of 12% to 75% sucrose or 30% to 40% glucose orally 2 minutes before one to 4 injections (one study used 3 oral doses every 30 seconds, and one study added topical EMLA cream).
The RJFT was easily exchanged in the outpatient office, and application of lidocaine/prilocaine cream 5% (Emla cream[R] 5%, AstraZeneca, Zug, Switzerland) was considered helpful to avoid pain at the jejunostomy and exit site of the guide thread.
They put Emla cream (a topical anesthetic) but it didn't work on me.
No significant difference in the rate of unsuccessful LP was found overall when a eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic (EMLA) was or was not used as a local anaesthetic cream for the LP.