epoch

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ep·och

 (ĕp′ək, ē′pŏk′)
n.
1. A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy.
2. A unit of geologic time that is a division of a period.
3. Astronomy An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference for specification of celestial coordinates.

[Medieval Latin epocha, measure of time, from Greek epokhē, a point in time; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

epoch

(ˈiːpɒk)
n
1. a point in time beginning a new or distinctive period: the invention of nuclear weapons marked an epoch in the history of warfare.
2. a long period of time marked by some predominant or typical characteristic; era
3. (Astronomy) astronomy a precise date to which information, such as coordinates, relating to a celestial body is referred
4. (Palaeontology) geology a unit of geological time within a period during which a series of rocks is formed: the Pleistocene epoch.
5. (General Physics) physics the displacement of an oscillating or vibrating body at zero time
[C17: from New Latin epocha, from Greek epokhē cessation; related to ekhein to hold, have]
epochal adj
ˈepˌochally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ep•och

(ˈɛp ək; esp. Brit. ˈi pɒk)

n.
1. a period of time marked by distinctive features, noteworthy events, changed conditions, etc.: an epoch of peace.
2. the beginning of a distinctive period in the history of anything.
3. a point of time distinguished by a particular event or state of affairs; a memorable date.
4. any of several divisions of a geologic period during which a geologic series is formed.
5. an arbitrarily fixed instant of time used as a reference in giving the elements of the orbit of a celestial body.
[1605–15; < New Latin epocha < Greek epochḗ pause, check, fixed point in time]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ep·och

(ĕp′ək, ē′pŏk′)
The shortest division of geologic time, being a subdivision of a period.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

epoch

- Pronounced EH-puhk, it is from Greek epokhe, "fixed point in time, stoppage," and it was first the initial point in a chronology from which succeeding years were numbered.
See also related terms for stoppage.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

epoch

A time unit within a geological period.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epoch - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or eventepoch - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
day - an era of existence or influence; "in the day of the dinosaurs"; "in the days of the Roman Empire"; "in the days of sailing ships"; "he was a successful pianist in his day"
historic period, age - an era of history having some distinctive feature; "we live in a litigious age"
modern era - the present or recent times
2.epoch - (astronomy) an arbitrarily fixed date that is the point in time relative to which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is recorded
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
date - the particular day, month, or year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class"
3.epoch - a unit of geological time that is a subdivision of a period and is itself divided into ages
geologic time, geological time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)
geological period, period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

epoch

noun era, time, age, period, date, aeon the beginning of a major epoch in world history
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

epoch

noun
A particular time notable for its distinctive characteristics:
age, day, era, period, time (often used in plural).
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَصْر
epoke
aikakausiajanjaksoepookkikäännekohta
tímamót
epocha
laikmets

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] Népoca f
to mark an epochhacer época, marcar un hito
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] népoque f, ère f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

epoch

nZeitalter nt (also Geol), → Epoche f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] n (period) → epoca, era
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

epoch

(ˈiːpok) , ((American) ˈepək) noun
(the start of) a particular period of history, development etc. The invention of printing marked an epoch in the history of education.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MOU was signed on Thursday by Minister of Finance Nigel Clarke; Chairman of EPOC, Keith Duncan; Governor of the Bank of Jamaica, Richard Byles, and other representatives of the Committee .
This is when we experience Epoc effect which Orange Theory Fitness calls the 'afterburn'.
jirovecii y como estas caracteristicas podrian explicar el efecto que la colonizacion por el hongo tiene en los pacientes con EPOC no inmunosuprimidos como uno de los factores perpetuadores de respuesta inflamatoria pulmonar que repercute en la progresion de la enfermedad.
La Organizacion Mundial de la Salud (OMS) calcula que para el 2020 la EPOC sera la quinta causa de anos de vida perdidos ajustados por invalidez, y la tercera causa de mortalidad, y su impacto sera mayor en los paises en vias de desarrollo.
The EPOC will provide joint financing for 23 projects of cooperation and the implementation of the EPOC is expected to further consolidate the ongoing collaboration between Italian and Indian universities, with around 200 partnership agreements already in operation.
Otros estudios avalan la asociacion de este polimorfismo en pacientes con EPOC y la aparicion de hipertension pulmonar (16,17).
In this regard, it could be hypothesized that the longer endurance time during an SE after a high-CHO diet period could lead to a greater EPOC and to a higher total energy expenditure in a given exercise training session, which could potentiate the body weight loss and reestablish metabolic balance in individuals engaged in training programs for health promotion.
Los pacientes con EPOC describen una calidad de vida alterada por sintomas como la disnea, exacerbaciones frecuentes y el curso progresivo de la enfermedad 3.