Erse


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Erse

 (ûrs)
n. Archaic

[Middle English Ersch, Erisch, Irish, from Old English Iras, the Irish; see Irish.]

Erse

(ɜːs)
n
(Languages) another name for Irish Gaelic
adj
(Languages) of or relating to the Irish Gaelic language
[C14: from Lowland Scots Erisch Irish; Irish being regarded as the literary form of Gaelic]

Scot′tish Gael′ic

or Scots Gaelic


n.
a Celtic language, closely related to Irish, spoken in the Hebrides and the Highlands of Scotland.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Erse - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and ScotlandErse - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and Scotland
Celtic, Celtic language - a branch of the Indo-European languages that (judging from inscriptions and place names) was spread widely over Europe in the pre-Christian era
Irish Gaelic, Irish - the Celtic language of Ireland
Scots Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic - the Gaelic of Scotland
Manx - the ancient Gaelic formerly spoken on the Isle of Man; the language is sometimes used on ceremonial occasions
Translations

Erse

n no plGälisch nt
References in classic literature ?
The cook was expressing herself in Norwegian, the parlour-maid in what appeared to be Erse.
Por esta razon se hace mas relevante analizar la nitidez del concepto (Foretica, 2006, 2008a, 2008b, 2011a, 2011b; Observatorio ERSE, 2010), es decir, la claridad con que el mismo ha sido asimilado o comprendido por el colectivo investigado (directores/as hoteleros/as) en relacion con la definicion de RSE generalmente aceptada y con una caracteristica bastante particular (como aporte a la discusion): su proceso evolutivo (ver Pena y Serra, 2012b).
Under the terms of the Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with local utility EDA, which was just ratified by Portuguese regulator ERSE, the resulting savings are shared between the investors and Portuguese end consumers.
This word is used in Erse for the variegated cloaths of the Highlanders.
The President of the ERSE, Jorge Vasconcelos, therefore handed in his resignation on 15 December, the same day that the the litigious decree was published and, as explained by Vasconcelos, "just as the conditions applicable to an independent regulatory function no longer apply".
Locations are very good; Matera, the ancient southern Italian town used in "The Passion of the Christ," again fills in evocatively as Jerusalem and environs, while Ouarzazate and other Moroccan locales provide di erse topography for the major treks involved.
ERSE robots or ERP sprue pickers are integrated via SPI interface and their own dedicated PLC controller.
Ossian, the third-century Gaelic bard who through the Scotsman James Macpherson's "translations" was to become a significant influence upon Zhukovsky, had been "rediscovered" in Macpherson's Fragments of Ancient Poetry Collected in the Highlands of Scotland and Translated from the Gaelic or Erse Language (1760).
ACROSS: 5 Altar, 11 Fat, 13 Hammerhead, 14 Oppressive, 15 Peru, 17 Prize, 18 German, 20 Related, 21 Trader, 22 Haberdashery, 24 River, 26 Shirts, 28 Aaron, 29 Beaten, 31 Lunge, 32 Interest, 34 Erse, 36 Freedom, 38 SOS, 39 Emphasised, 40 Balanced, 45 Eric, 48 Aden, 49 Entreaty, 54 Ragamuffin, 55 Lie, 56 Oarsman, 57 Yard, 59 Torments, 60 Nasty, 61 Waddle, 63 Tonic, 64 Sprite, 66 Adder, 68 Accidentally, 70 Pillow, 71 Hearses, 73 Adduce, 75 Bulge, 76 Gush, 78 Transcends, 79 Bloodhound, 80 Eye, 81 Risky.
Encyclopedic in its breadth, the book provides extensive discussions of the conceptual and methodological issues surrounding interview practice in relation to forms of interviewing, new technology, div erse data gathering and analytic strategies, and the various ways interviewing relates to distinctive respondents.
What makes Macpherson interesting in this context, and has led to his being regarded as a precursor of modernism, is precisely the deliberate adoption of a kind of translationese, or what Percy called the 'studied affectation of Erse idiom' in English.
Yeats, defining in his Introduction to The Oxford Book of Modern Verse, 1936, stated, with typical Irish exaggeration, that, in 1900, 'everybody got down off his stilts; henceforth nobody drank absinthe with his black coffee; nobody went mad; nobody committed suicide; nobody joined the Catholic Church; or,' he covered himself with practised Erse cunning, 'if they did I have forgotten.