Edmund

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Edmund

(ˈɛdmənd)
n
(Biography) Saint, also called Saint Edmund Rich. 1175–1240, English churchman: archbishop of Canterbury (1234–40). Feast day: Nov 16.
Translations
Edmund
Edmond
Edmund

Edmund

[ˈedmənd] NEdmundo
References in periodicals archive ?
After 1250 only a handful of such names remained in general use, in particular Eadweard, Eadmund and Cudbeorh, which was popular in northern England, and Eadgyd, which we know in their later forms of Edward, Edmund, Cuthbert, and Edith.
The details of such an arrangement are, of course, impossible to recover, but they may have revolved around the idea that Athelstan would be king over the southumbrian English but not found his own dynasty and thereby pave the way for his succession by his youngest half-brothers, Eadgifu's sons Eadmund and Eadred.
Edmund defiantly responds to the challenge by stressing his own upright postural positioning and by negating the same words used in Hingwar's demands: "ne abihd neefre eadmund hingware on life" (91).
3) Especially when understood within the framework of the royal vitae of Oswald, Eadmund, Edward, and Kenelm, Havelok the Dane can more appropriately be understood as a hagiographic romance: King Apelwold of England functions as a holy ruler who prefigures the sanctity of the protagonist, while Havelok himself emerges as a Christ-like hero who shares more affinities with Christ and the saints than he does with other romance heroes.
The suffix represented by <es> appears also on genitive forms of the name Eadmund, with deuterotheme cognate with OE mund f.
His sons were Eadred and Eadmund and his three daughters, Eadburg, Eadgifu, and Eadgyth.
In VIII AEthelred, he writes: "Ac uton don swa us pearf is: uton niman us to bisnan paet aerran worldwitan to raede geraedon, AEpelstan 7 Eadmund 7 Eadgar pe nihst woes, hu hi God weordodon 7 Godes lage heoldon 7 Godes gafel loestan> pa hwile pe hi leofodon" [But let us do as is necessary for us: let us take as our example what earlier worldly authorities advisedly decreed--AEpelstan and Edmund and Edgar who was last--how they worshipped God and held God's law and rendered God's tribute, as long as they lived].
58-68), or St Eadmund the King who is beaten as he stands 'naked and faste i-bounde' (44.
It also includes pastoral letters (including Wulfstan's revised version of AElfric's Pastoral Letter to him); a number of law codes (of AEthelraed and Cnut, interwoven with the non-Wulfstanian codes of Eadgar, Eadmund and AEthelstan); selections from his Institutes of Polity; the Northumbrian Priests' Law (although Wulfstan's authorship of this text is contested) ; his Canons of Edgar, and the prose sections from his Old English translation of the so-called "Benedictine Office.