Bronze Age

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Related to Early Bronze Age: Late Bronze Age, Middle bronze age, Early Iron Age

Bronze Age

n.
A period of human culture between the Stone Age and the Iron Age, characterized by the use of weapons and implements made of bronze. See Usage Note at Three Age system.

bronze age

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a period of human existence marked by war and violence, following the golden and silver ages and preceding the iron age

Bronze Age

n
(Archaeology) archaeol
a. a technological stage between the Stone and Iron Ages, beginning in the Middle East about 4500 bc and lasting in Britain from about 2000 to 500 bc, during which weapons and tools were made of bronze and there was intensive trading
b. (as modifier): a Bronze-Age tool.

Bronze′ Age`


n.
a period in the history of humankind, following the Stone Age and preceding the Iron Age, during which bronze weapons and implements were used: representative Old World cultures are the Minoan and Mycenaean.
[1860–65]

Bronze Age

The period between the Stone Age and the Iron Age during which people discovered how to make tools and weapons from bronze.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bronze Age - (archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
prehistoric culture, prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
2.bronze age - (classical mythology) the third age of the world, marked by war and violence
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Translations
pronssikausi
bronstijd

Bronze Age

n the Bronze Agel'età del bronzo
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study recently showed how people settled across Eurasia when they analyzed a wooden chest found in the Swiss Alps dating back to the early Bronze Age and found it contained the remnants of grains, including wheat.
[USA], Sep 5 ( ANI ): At the end of the Stone Age and in the early Bronze Age, families were established in a surprising manner in the Lechtal, south of Augsburg, Germany.
Liphschitz, "Plant economy and diet in the Early Bronze Age in Israel: A summary of present research," pp.
In fifteen chapters Bar seeks to describe the end of the Chalcolithic period and the beginning of the Early Bronze Age (EB) in this particular part of what the author calls the "Lower Jordan Valley." Not only are the results of the excavations at five sites in Ein Hilu, Fazael, and Sheikh Diab presented, but also the survey conducted during the last decades by Adam Zertal (1996, 2005) and the author of the volume.
"[euro]ese date from the Early Bronze Age period, between 2500BC and 1800BC but we had to send samples of bone to be radiocarbon dated to con-rm the age of the burial."
There is, of course, always scope for improvement, and we are about to embark on a project to reinstall the Villa's collection of Greek and Roman art along cultural-historical lines, starting from the Early Bronze Age and running through the Roman Empire up to the coming of Christianity.
More than 1,000 artifacts were discovered by the British delegation, among them 98 objects from the early Bronze Age and the third millennium B.C., 434 objects from the middle Bronze Age, 41 from the late Bronze Age, 104 from the Iron Age, 100 from the Roman period, as well as other statues made of stone and mud of historical significance.
You can see how the finds from an Early Bronze Age grave are recreated using the techniques of the time at our metal workshop every Wednesday and Sunday.
Moreover, the finding now links the decline of the Indus cities to a documented global scale climate event and its impact on the Old Kingdom in Egypt, the Early Bronze Age civilizations of Greece and Crete, and the Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia, whose decline has previously been linked to abrupt climate change.
"Focusing on this small but highly important geographic region meant we could generate a gapless record, and directly observe genetic changes in 'real-time' from 7,500 to 3,500 years ago, from the earliest farmers to the early Bronze Age." "Our study shows that a simple mix of indigenous hunter-gatherers and the incoming Near Eastern farmers cannot explain the modern-day diversity alone," said joint-lead author Guido Brandt, PhD candidate at the University of Mainz.
He had already directed important excavations at Early Bronze Age Vounous, Chalcolithic Erimi and the Neolithic settlement of Khirokitia.
This pottery dates to the early Bronze Age and suggests the burial is contemporary with a midden that was discovered approximately 20 metres to the west.

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