East India Company

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East India Company

n
1. (Historical Terms) the company chartered in 1600 by the British government to trade in the East Indies: after being driven out by the Dutch, it developed trade with India until the Indian Mutiny (1857), when the Crown took over the administration: the company was dissolved in 1874
2. (Commerce) any similar trading company, such as any of those founded by the Dutch, French, and Danes in the 17th and 18th centuries

East India Company

A trading company which effectively ruled British India from 1708–1857.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.East India Company - an English company formed in 1600 to develop trade with the new British colonies in India and southeastern AsiaEast India Company - an English company formed in 1600 to develop trade with the new British colonies in India and southeastern Asia; in the 18th century it assumed administrative control of Bengal and held it until the British army took over in 1858 after the Indian Mutiny
company - an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
References in periodicals archive ?
French East India companies; a historical account and record of trade.
Lenman, "The English and Dutch East India Companies and the Birth of Consumerism in the Augustan World," Eighteenth-Century Life XIV [1990]: 56-57).
This biography, then, forthrightly reflects the available material, with little on Sandys's personal life but with great detail on his parliamentary actions and considerable detail on his investments in and direction of New World exploration through the Virginia and East India Companies. This is a pity.
Surprisingly, the early sixteenth- and seventeenth-century trading companies-the English and Dutch East india companies, the Muscovy Company, the Hudson's Bay Company, and the Royal African Company-which traded goods and services across national boundaries and had a geographical reach rivaling today's largest multinational firms, have been generally ignored.
Chapter 1 addresses the foundation and structural organisation of the Danish East India Companies and delves to some extent into the alliance and treaty-making activity of the Danish companies with sovereign lords in South Asia.
The merchants variously sought to circumvent these restrictions either by calling at ports that were not within the sphere of Dutch commercial hegemony (such as Aceh, Johor, or Bantam), by acquiring passes from rival European powers (such as the Danes, the French, and the British East India Companies), or by transporting their goods on space leased on vessels scheduled to sail to and from Southeast Asia.
This was utilised by the English and French East India Companies, who had factories at the creek until the early 18th century.
The pre-nineteenth-century focus of this volume is valuable as each chapter makes the case that the local and regional forces at play are just as significant as the interplay with external forces (such as the Iberians and East India companies).
That's why Europe's various East India Companies carried large supplies of silver to the East.

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