Indiaman

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In·di·a·man

 (ĭn′dē-ə-mən)
n.
A large ship formerly used by European and North American merchants on trade routes to India, East or Southeast Asia, or the West Indies.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Indiaman

(ˈɪndɪəmən)
n, pl -men
(Historical Terms) (formerly) a large merchant ship engaged in trade with India
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Indiaman - a large sailing ship that was engaged in the British trade with IndiaIndiaman - a large sailing ship that was engaged in the British trade with India
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
They are now (there is every reason to believe) on their passage to Bombay, in an East Indiaman. The ship (barring accidents) will touch at no other port on her way out; and the authorities at Bombay (already communicated with by letter, overland) will be prepared to board the vessel, the moment she enters the harbour.
The heir to the estate (Sir Percival having left no issue) was a son of Sir Felix Glyde's first cousin, an officer in command of an East Indiaman. He would find his unexpected inheritance sadly encumbered, but the property would recover with time, and, if "the captain" was careful, he might be a rich man yet before he died.
Such of them as are married have the wisdom to retire to their own houses; but the bachelors act just as an East Indiaman and pirates are wont to do; for they lavish, eat, drink, and play all away as long as the goods hold out; and when these are gone, they even sell their embroidery, their lace, and their clothes.
She had flirted all the way to Madras with the Captain and chief mate of the Ramchunder East Indiaman, and had a season at the Presidency with her brother and Mrs.
"Jane, I go in six weeks; I have taken my berth in an East Indiaman which sails on the 20th of June."
Miss Mills had sailed, and Dora and I had gone aboard a great East Indiaman at Gravesend to see her; and we had had preserved ginger, and guava, and other delicacies of that sort for lunch; and we had left Miss Mills weeping on a camp-stool on the quarter-deck, with a large new diary under her arm, in which the original reflections awakened by the contemplation of Ocean were to be recorded under lock and key.
One very interesting exhibit at Amsterdam's National Maritime Museum is the 18th-century replica East Indiaman "Amsterdam" which takes you right back to the Dutch Golden Age when the Netherlands capital was the world's largest port and Holland was truly a world power.
The first was titled A Portuguese East Indiaman from the 1502--1503 Fleet of Vasco da Gama off Al Hallaniyah Island, Oman: an interim report, and was written in collaboration with David Parham and Bruno Frohlich, while the second, called An Early Portuguese MarinereC[bar]s Astrolabe from the Sodre Wreck-site, Al Hallaniyah, Oman was released on 16 March 2019, and was co-written with Jason Warnett and Mark Williams.
The Zuytdorp, a Dutch East Indiaman, sailed from the Netherlands in 1711 on a trading voyage to the east.
They left Batavia on board the Ouderamstel, an East Indiaman of 1,100 ton, built in 1765 on the VOC wharves in Middelburg.
On a trip from Batavia to Kharg, a trade station of the voc in the Persian Gulf, the East Indiaman 'Amstelveen' shipwrecked on the south coast of Oman in August 1763.

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