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n. pl. ech·oes
a. Repetition of a sound by reflection of sound waves from a surface.
b. The sound produced in this manner.
2. A repetition or an imitation: a fashion that is an echo of an earlier style.
3. A remnant or vestige: found echoes of past civilizations while examining artifacts in the Middle East.
4. One who imitates another, as in opinions, speech, or dress.
5. A sympathetic response: Their demand for justice found an echo in communities across the nation.
6. A consequence or repercussion: Her resignation had echoes throughout the department.
7. Repetition of certain sounds or syllables in poetry, as in echo verse.
8. Music Soft repetition of a note or phrase.
9. Electronics A reflected wave received by a radio or radar.
10. An echocardiogram.
v. ech·oed, ech·o·ing, ech·oes
1. To repeat (a sound) by the reflection of sound waves from a surface.
2. To repeat or imitate: followers echoing the cries of their leader; events that echoed a previous incident in history.
1. To be repeated by or as if by an echo: The shout echoed off the wall. The speaker's words echoed in her mind.
2. To resound with or as if with an echo; reverberate: rooms echoing with laughter.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin ēchō, from Greek ēkhō.]

ech′o·er n.
ech′o·ey adj.
Synonyms: echo, reflect, resound, reverberate
These verbs mean to be repeated by the reflection of sound waves: a cry that echoed through the canyon; traffic noise reflecting off the buildings; a loud hammering that resounded through the tunnel; a final chord that reverberated in the concert hall.


n. Greek Mythology
A nymph whose unrequited love for Narcissus caused her to pine away until only her voice remained.


See also sound.

Rare. the branch of acoustics that studies echoes. Also called cataphonics.
Obsolete the branch of physics that studies reflected sounds.
References in classic literature ?
Though the arts of peace were unknown to this fatal region, its forests were alive with men; its shades and glens rang with the sounds of martial music, and the echoes of its mountains threw back the laugh, or repeated the wanton cry, of many a gallant and reckless youth, as he hurried by them, in the noontide of his spirits, to slumber in a long night of forgetfulness.
The final echoes of Alice Pyncheon's performance (or Clifford's, if his we must consider it) were driven away by no less vulgar a dissonance than the ringing of the shop-bell.
Dimmesdale's outcry, and interpreted it, with its multitudinous echoes and reverberations, as the clamour of the fiends and night-hags, with whom she was well known to make excursions in the forest.
I had wandered into it at noontime, when all nature is peculiarly quiet, and was startled by the roar of my own gun, as it broke the Sabbath stillness around and was prolonged and reverberated by the angry echoes.
While his one live leg made lively echoes along the deck, every stroke of his dead limb sounded like a coffin-tap.
Quite apart from her own troubles she was boiling over with a general sense of the injustice of it, and she told what she thought of the packers, and what she thought of a world where such things were allowed to happen; and then, while the echoes of the hall rang with the shock of her terrible voice, she sat down again and fanned herself, and the meeting gathered itself together and proceeded to discuss the election of a recording secretary.
The light shines only on a small space around her; therefore, she needs must yearn towards the unknown; and the voices and shadowy movings which come to her from out the cloudy pillar of inspiration have each one echoes and answers in her own expecting nature.
The queen's guards fell into line, and she and they marched away, with their torch-bearers, and woke the echoes of the cavernous tunnels with the measured beat of their retreating footfalls.