economic rent

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economic rent

n.
See rent1.

economic rent

n
1. (Economics) economics a payment to a factor of production (land, labour, or capital) in excess of that needed to keep it in its present use
2. (Law) (in Britain) the rent of a dwelling based on recouping the costs of providing it plus a profit sufficient to motivate the landlord to let it

ec′onom′ic rent′


n.
the return on a productive resource, as land or labor, that is greater than the amount necessary to keep the resource producing.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.economic rent - the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions
proceeds, take, takings, yield, payoff, issue, return - the income or profit arising from such transactions as the sale of land or other property; "the average return was about 5%"
References in periodicals archive ?
If, however the government is assumed to be nonbenevolent, then the grabbing hand of government intervenes to create economic rents.
A federal government system, along with political reforms, reduces the economic rents created by the bureaucrats in various government levels.
The key recommendation is to change the corporate tax base from shareholder income to above-normal profits--that is, economic rents (see Box 1)--based on the source principle.
Uber was disrupting a taxi cartel that was able to extract significant economic rents from customers, made possible by heavy protection from local regulators.
Manjoo suggests that it's because Uber was disrupting a taxi cartel that was able to extract significant economic rents from customers, made possible by heavy protection from local regulators.
Acemoglu and Robinson (2006) stress that new technologies and improvements in institutions are often blocked due to the fear of losing power, not the economic rents.
He offered three separate economic rents for the property: monthly rent for the retail space; monthly rent for the car service area; and monthly rents for the apartments.
liberties generally yields economic rents for the public in general.
It is apparent from Smith and Yandle's contribution that wherever economic rents can be created, we will find willing suppliers (elected officials and regulators) and willing demanders (Bootleggers).
Given data on the costs associated with distilleries and feedstocks, we are then able to calculate and simulate the county-level economic rents from different policies.
A major theme is the role of economic rents from natural resources in shaping the current economic situation.
The attempt to control economic rents (through price controls for existing units) while preserving market forces at the margin (through exemption of new construction) is remarkably similar to the policies enacted by Congress in 1973 and 1975 in reaction to the off price shock of 1973--that is, putting price controls on "old oil" while keeping world market prices for "new oil" and imports.

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