Edentata


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Edentata - order of mammals having few or no teeth including: New World anteatersEdentata - order of mammals having few or no teeth including: New World anteaters; sloths; armadillos
animal order - the order of animals
Eutheria, subclass Eutheria - all mammals except monotremes and marsupials
edentate - primitive terrestrial mammal with few if any teeth; of tropical Central America and South America
suborder Xenarthra, Xenarthra - armadillos; American anteaters; sloths
family Mylodontidae, Mylodontidae - extinct South American edentates
References in classic literature ?
Within nearly this same period (as proved by the shells at Bahia Blanca) South America possessed, as we have just seen, a mastodon, horse, hollow- horned ruminant, and the same three genera (as well as several others) of the Edentata.
Cetacea (whales) and Edentata (armadilloes, scaly ant-eaters, &c.
In the Philippines, multiple species of Cycas were identified to be present such as Cycas edentata.
Helicostomella edentata (FaurACopyright-Framiet 1924)
Anastrepha edentata and other fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) detected on Key Largo, Florida.
Outbreak of pox disease among carnivora (Felidae) and Edentata.
Ordem Especies Carnivora Cerdocyon thous Eira barbara Nasua nasua Chiroptera Carollia perspicillata Desmodus rotundus Glossophaga soricina Phyllostomus hastatus Edentata Dasypus novemcintus Marsupialia Didelphis albiventris Didelphis marsupialis Primates Aloutta spp Ateles spp Cacajao calvus Callicebus personatus nigrifons Callithrix spp Cebus spp Leontopithecus spp Saguinus spp Saimiri spp Rodentia Akodon spp Coendu spp Dasyprocta spp Sciurus spp Quadro 4.
Under the new proposed classification of mammals of Wilson and Reeder (2005) and following the criteria of McKenna and Bell (1997), armadillos form the new order called Cingulata, discarding previous criteria where armadillos were included along with aardvarks and anteaters in the common order Edentata or Xenarthra (Tirira 2007).
That plus subsistence hunting destroys anteater habitat and reduces their numbers, says John Aguiar, coordinator of the IUCN's edentate specialist group and editor of the scholarly journal Edentata.