Edessa


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E·des·sa

 (ĭ-dĕs′ə)
An ancient city of Mesopotamia on the site of present-day Urfa in southeast Turkey. A major Christian center after the third century ad, it was ruled at various times by the Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, and Crusaders before falling to the Seljuk Turks in the 12th century.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Edessa

(ɪˈdɛsə)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient city on the N edge of the Syrian plateau, founded as a Macedonian colony by Seleucus I: a centre of early Christianity. Modern name: Urfa
2. (Placename) a market town in Greece: ancient capital of Macedonia. Pop (municipality): 25 729 (2001). Ancient name: Aegae Modern Greek name: Édhessa
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

E•des•sa

(ɪˈdɛs ə)

n.
an ancient city in NW Mesopotamia, on the site of modern Urfa, in Turkey: an early center of Christianity.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Right after Prime Minister Zaev, a citizen, who has been redirected from one institution to another for ten years in roder to be issued documents in which the names of Lerin (Florin) and Voden (Edessa) would be written with the Greek toponyms in order to be recognized by the Greek administration, felt the benefits of this project, too.
From Edessa, Christos has been involved in music since he was young.
627-1229), Syriac polymath scholar and bishop Jacob of Edessa, Mu'ammar al-Qadhaghafi's (1942-2011) jamahiriyya political system in Libya, and the old Muslim community in the Indian city of Kozhikode.
He is also shown holding an image of Jesus Christ, known as Image of Edessa. King Abagar of Edessa, who had leprosy, was healed when he pressed his face on the cloth with Jesus' image, which the Lord gave to Jude.
Eighteen of the bowl texts in this Corpus are in Estrangela and thirty-one are in "Manichaean." It appears to be generally accepted that the Estrangela script originated in the region of Edessa, whence it moved eastwards with Christianity.
FIRST REPORT OF EDIBLE BUGS EDESSA BIFIDA AND EDESSA CHAMPIONI (HEMIPTERA: PENTATOMIDAE) AND THEIR IMPORTANCE IN THE ENTOMOPHAGY CULTURE IN THE RURAL COMMUNITY "EL ZOMPANTLE", TAXCO DE ALARCON, GUERRERO, MEXICO
Graduates of the Master of Landscape Architecture of Neapolis University, Pavlos Zanos and George Charalambous, presented papers, which were part of their Master thesis at the 18th Panhellenic Forestry Conference in Edessa .
Historian Ralph Ellis, author of Jesus, King of Edessa, believes there is no problem in embellishing a story to reflect what might have happened, especially when it reflects common and documented practises at the time.
The ever-changing principalities of Antioch, Tripoli, Damascus, Aleppo and Edessa (to name only the major ones) dominated the rough politics of the region for many centuries after the first flush of the Muslim first invasion faded and left the cities and their rulers able to seek their independence.