editress

editress

(ˈɛdɪtrəs) or

editrix

n
(Professions) a female editor
References in periodicals archive ?
Fionnaula Dillane's Before George Eliot examines Marian Evans' relationship with the periodical press and the personae she constructed, including the '"character of editress' (Evans' own ironic description); the ambiguously gendered reviewer; the casuist and companion of her clerical scenes who is at once obvious and opaque"; and finally the "pompous city bachelor Theophrastus Such" (6).
The Editress' virtues died with her, None of the newly cut stationery can compare.
In a private letter written the following year, Freund describes Hopkins as "a colored editress, whose salary is eight dollars a week when she gets it--with a bedridden mother to support" (qtd.
Petrylaite is the author of the monograph "Collective Labour Disputes" and the co-author of several monographs on labour law and civil service, the responsible editress and the co-author of manual "Labour Law".
In 1923 when Stella Allan had been at the paper for fifteen years, her title was 'Social Editress' and she had a staff of five women journalists.
"There is no watchdog of any sort over what's printed, or not printed, in readers' letters and the editress is a law unto herself which all the more makes it that she should be seen to be impartial and that impartiality isn't plain at the moment."
Harper, "Editress" of the Women's Department, that railwaymen were "quite satisfied to take the wife's love for granted ...
She calls herself "a queer Filipina mestiza and editress." Having once dated women, Alcantara-Tan married a man and now identifies as "omnisexual," meaning she is attracted to transsexual people as well as men and women.
Anna Wintour (Vogue editress) is like the coolest senior girl, totally thin, everyone wanting to be her best friend.
Editress Poetry: In the interest of a truth affecting others, I ask correction of the most flagrantly and blatantly mendacious statement in Gregory's August note: "Like Douglas he ignores the fact that labor is an integral part in the denomination of money values."
Other real-people models, including Jane Pratt, the pathbreaking former editress of Sassy magazine, and Pat Hearn, the ever soignee art dealer, were transformed into inhabitants of a leghorn-hued country idyll, with salmon accents.