Daladier

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Related to Edouard Daladier: Polish Corridor, Maurice Gamelin

Da·la·dier

 (də-lä′dē-ā′, dä-lä-dyā′), Édouard 1884-1970.
French statesman who signed the Munich Pact with Adolf Hitler in September 1938. He was arrested by the Germans after the fall of France (1940) and remained in captivity until 1945.

Daladier

(French daladje)
n
(Biography) Édouard (edwar). 1884–1970, French radical socialist statesman; premier of France (1933; 1934; 1938–40) and signatory of the Munich Pact (1938)

Da•la•dier

(dəˈlɑ diˌeɪ, də lɑdˈyeɪ)

n.
Édouard, 1884–1970, premier of France 1933, 1934, 1938–40.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neville Chamberlain and Edouard Daladier believed that the only alternatives to appeasement were a war with Germany, for which Britain and France were unprepared, or shameful acquiescence in a German attack on Czechoslovakia.
Early on September 30, 1938, Chamberlain, who had been the MP for Birmingham Ladywood and then Birmingham Edgbaston, and French Prime Minister Edouard Daladier signed the Munich pact with Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.
WHEN bestselling novelist Robert Harris found himself in a German apartment where Hitler, Mussolini, French premier Edouard Daladier and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain signed the Munich agreement in 1938, in an effort to keep peace prior to World War II, he felt the hairs stand up on the back of his neck.
as he releases his latest novel munich, robert harris the bestselling author of fatherland, talks about war and writer's block with HANNAH STEPHENSON WHEN bestselling novelist Robert Harris found himself in a German apartment where Hitler, Mussolini, French premier Edouard Daladier and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain signed the Munich agreement in 1938, in an effort to keep peace prior to World War II, he felt the hairs stand up on the back of his neck.
Chamberlain, French Prime Minister Edouard Daladier and Italian leader Benito Mussolini met The Fuhrer in Munich and allowed him to take Sudetenland.
Among these were British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and French Prime Minister Edouard Daladier.
A state visit to France in 1938, for example, prompted French Prime Minister Edouard Daladier to describe her as "an excessively ambitious young woman who would be ready to sacrifice every other country in the world so that she may remain Queen".
It may be fashionable to belittle the "lessons of Munich," when Neville Chamberlain and Edouard Daladier appeased Hitler, deferring to his claims on Czechoslovakia.
A repeat of the infamous agreement between Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Edouard Daladier and Neville Chamberlain, in which the Sudetenland, a province belonging to Czechoslovakia though inhabited by Germans, was turned over to Nazi Germany, leaving democratic little Czechoslovakia defenseless.
History has not been kind to Neville Chamberlain or Edouard Daladier, and in the harsh light of hindsight it is easy to denounce appeasement as a major cause of the war in Europe.
The most notable prisoners included Edouard Daladier, France's prime minister until his resignation in March 1940.
Opposition leaders accused Sarkozy of capitulating, comparing Merkel to 19th century German leader Otto von Bismarck and the French president to Edouard Daladier, who had signed the notorious Munich Accords to just appease Hitler in 1938.