Edward II


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Related to Edward II: Edward III

Edward II

1284-1327.
King of England (1307-1327) who was defeated at Bannockburn by the Scots (1314). Captured (1326) and deposed (1327) during the rebellion of Roger de Mortimer, he was imprisoned in Berkeley Castle and murdered.

Edward II

n
(Biography) 1284–1327, king of England (1307–27); son of Edward I. He invaded Scotland but was defeated by Robert Bruce at Bannockburn (1314). He was deposed by his wife Isabella and Roger Mortimer; died in prison
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Noun1.Edward II - King of England from 1307 to 1327 and son of Edward IEdward II - King of England from 1307 to 1327 and son of Edward I; was defeated at Bannockburn by the Scots led by Robert the Bruce; was deposed and died in prison (1284-1327)
References in classic literature ?
Edward II gave to Piers Gaveston a suit of red-gold armour studded with jacinths, a collar of gold roses set with turquoise-stones, and a skull-cap parseme with pearls.
The youngsters had been learning about the battle in 1314, when Robert the Bruce defeated King Edward II.
1066: The Battle of Hastings sees Duke William of Normandy and the Norman army defeat the English forces of Harold II 1322: Robert the Bruce of Scotland defeats King Edward II of England at Byland, forcing Edward to accept Scotland's independence 1586: Mary Queen of Scots goes on trial for conspiracy against Elizabeth I 1926: A.
1327: Edward II was murdered in the dungeon of Berkeley Castle in Gloucestershire to ensure his son Edward III could succeed to the throne.
To commemorate the visit of King Edward II to the area in August 1318, the church, with the help of a local living history group, will see a recreation of certain aspects of life in the early 14th Century.
In the latest of the series, editor Kirk Melnikoff tackles Christopher Marlowe's Edward II and achieves these expansive goals.
1322 - Robert the Bruce defeats King Edward II of England at Byland, forcing Edward to accept Scotland's independence.
4 In which battle did Robert the Bruce's Scottish army defeat Edward II of England?
Scholars of literature analyze Christopher Marlowe's Edward II, widely considered to be his most mature drama, and one of the earliest examples of English history plays.
Thomas Cartelli argued that Christopher Marlowe's EdwardII is the "most modern play of early modern England's most modern playwright." Edward II, he contended, resonates today not just because of its interest in a "homosexual monarch," but because of its "demystified portrayal of power politics." (1) This latter entity hinges in part on "personal desires and ambitions" and a convergence of communication tools and skills.
It was supposedly named after the alleged lover of King Edward II and is known for its gourmet feasts.
The show covers events which are impossible to ignore: The defeat of Edward I's army by William Wallace at the Battle of Stirling Bridge, Edward's return to retake the castle with the largest siege engine ever conceived, The War Wolf and Robert the Bruce's crushing defeat of Edward II's army at the Battle of Bannockburn.