Edward IV


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Related to Edward IV: Edward III, Edward VI, Elizabeth Woodville

Edward IV

1442-1483.
King of England (1461-1470 and 1471-1483) who was crowned after leading the Yorkists to victory in the Wars of the Roses. In 1470 he was dethroned in a rebellion but won back the crown in a battle at Tewkesbury (1471).

Edward IV

n
(Biography) 1442–83, king of England (1461–70; 1471–83); son of Richard, duke of York. He defeated Henry VI in the Wars of the Roses and became king (1461). In 1470 Henry was restored to the throne, but Edward recovered the crown by his victory at Tewkesbury
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Noun1.Edward IV - King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483Edward IV - King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483; was dethroned in 1470 but regained the throne in 1471 by his victory at the battle of Tewkesbury (1442-1483)
References in classic literature ?
All that troubled him but little; and he gave a warm reception every evening to the wine of the royal vintage of Chaillot, without a suspicion that several flasks of that same wine (somewhat revised and corrected, it is true, by Doctor Coictier), cordially offered to Edward IV. by Louis XI., would, some fine morning, rid Louis XI.
In 1468 Princess Margaret, the sister of King Edward IV, married the Duke of Burgundy and came to live in Flanders, for in those days Flanders was under the rule of the Dukes of Burgundy.
Besides that he must have led a busy social life, for he was a favorite with Edward IV, and with his successors Richard III and Henry VII too.
Thus Richard III., for instance, was marvellously served by his conscience after the putting away of the two children of Edward IV.; in fact, he could say, `These two children of a cruel and persecuting king, who have inherited the vices of their father, which I alone could perceive in their juvenile propensities -- these two children are impediments in my way of promoting the happiness of the English people, whose unhappiness they (the children) would infallibly have caused.' Thus was Lady Macbeth served by her conscience, when she sought to give her son, and not her husband
King Edward (we are not told which among the monarchs of that name, but, from his temper and habits, we may suppose Edward IV.) sets forth with his court to a gallant hunting-match in Sherwood Forest, in which, as is not unusual for princes in romance, he falls in with a deer of extraordinary size and swiftness, and pursues it closely, till he has outstripped his whole retinue, tired out hounds and horse, and finds himself alone under the gloom of an extensive forest, upon which night is descending.
1471 - Battle of Tewkesbury, final battle between Houses of Lancaster and York: Prince of Wales, Edward of Westminster killed and King Edward IV restored to his throne.
1483: The young Edward V acceded to the throne on the death of Edward IV. He was never crowned and disappeared, believed murdered, 75 days later.
Skidmore focuses on Richard's martial prowess, contrasting his loyalty to his brother, Edward IV, with the self-interest of their brother George, whom Edward IV eventually executed for treason.
This biography charts the life of Sir John Tiptoft, the Earl of Worcester, who held positions under Henry VI and Edward IV. The book notes that although he had a reputation for brutality when he was Constable of England, he was also a scholar and patron.
By marriage, their blood passed to the European kings of Portugal and Castile, and through them to England's 15th century King Edward IV, the UPI report concludes.
HAPPENED ON THIS DAY 1483: The young Edward V acceded to the throne on the death of Edward IV. He was never crowned and disappeared, believed murdered, 75 days later.
She was the mother of two Yorkist kings, Edward IV and Richard III, and her granddaughter, Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, was married to Henry VII, the progenitor of the Tudor dynasty.