Eichmann


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Eich·mann

 (īk′mən, īKH′-, īKH-män′), Adolf 1906-1962.
German Nazi official who as head of the Gestapo's Jewish section (1939-1945) was chiefly responsible for the murder of millions of Jews during World War II. After the war he fled to South America, was captured by the Israeli secret service (1960), and was tried and executed in Israel.

Eichmann

(German ˈaiçman)
n
(Biography) Karl Adolf (ˈaːdɔlf). 1902–62, Austrian Nazi official, who took a leading role in organizing the extermination of the European Jews. He escaped to Argentina after World War II, but was captured and executed in Israel as a war criminal
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Noun1.Eichmann - Austrian who became the Nazi official who administered the concentration camps where millions of Jews were murdered during World War II (1906-1962)Eichmann - Austrian who became the Nazi official who administered the concentration camps where millions of Jews were murdered during World War II (1906-1962)
References in periodicals archive ?
Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer, by Bettina Stangneth, deftly explores Adolf Eichmann's escape from Europe after World War II, his life in Argentina, his capture, his trial and his post-War image.
The German philosopher Bettina Stangneth's ''Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer'' responds to Hannah Arendt's extraordinarily and perversely influential ''Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil.''
Informed by a broad investigation of Holocaust cinema's treatment of women generally, this article focuses on the particularly problematic depiction of the 'evil woman' in Robert Young's Eichmann (2007), a film that goes to great lengths to portray deviant and aggressive female sexuality as responsible for the moral corruption of the narrative's male protagonist, Adolf Eichmann, who was one of the major players in planning the deportation of Jews to extermination camps.
After The New Yorker invited philosopher Hannah Arendt to cover the trials of Adolph Eichmann, one of the major architects of the Holocaust who managed the logistics of the mass deportation of Jews to extermination camps in German-occupied Eastern Europe, Arendt's writing appeared in feature articles spanning five parts.
Adolf Eichmann was responsible for rounding up Jews in Germany and in the conquered countries as an integral part of Hitler's "final solution." After the defeat of fascism, Eichmann flees to avoid trial and punishment, and settles in obscurity in Argentina.
The job of rendering such a judgment fell to three judges in Jerusalem, Israel, in 1961, when they conducted the trial of Adolf Eichmann, who, during World War II, was the director of Subsection IV-B-4 of the Head Office for Reich Security, an office concerned exclusively with the so-called Jewish Question.
Originally titled The Controversy, the film portrays Arendt and her milieu during the period that she covered the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem for The New Yorker.
When the Mossad, the Israeli intelligence agency, captures the Nazi officer Adolf Eichmann and takes him clandestinely to Jerusalem to stand trial, Arendt, who has a strong philosophical interest in totalitarianism, discusses with her husband, Heinrich (Axel Milberg), about asking William Shawn (Nicholas Woodeson), the editor of The New Yorker, to send her to cover the impending trial for the magazine.
Eichmann's Jews: The Jewish Administration of Holocaust Vienna, 1938-1945.