EIA

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EIA

abbreviation for
(Veterinary Science) equine infectious anaemia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Cuadro 1 Caracteristicas microbiologicas de Eikenella corrodens (Eiken 1958), Jackson & Goodman 1972 (1) Taxonomia - Proteobacteria del grupo [beta] - Familia Neisseriaceae Habitat Cavidad oral y tracto gastrointestinal Morfologia Bacilos pleomorficos, no ramificados.
Other bacterial organisms isolated from these wounds included Weeksella zoohelcum, Eikenella corrodens, Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, and Corynebacterium spp., coagulase-negative Staphylococci, and unidentified gram-positive cocci and enteric gram-negative rods.
** 12 gram-negative bacteria including Enterobacter cloacae (two), Eikenella corrodens, Escherichia coli, Leclercia spp., Moraxella catarrhalis, Serratia marcescens, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, unspecified gram-negative rods (three), unspecified anaerobic gram-negative cocci; 10 gram-positive bacteria including Actinomyces spp.
The 10 species identified by the ParoCheck10[R] microarray detection system were as follows: The red complex: Porphyromonasgingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola; the orange complex: Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra and Prevotella intermedia; the green complex: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens; the blue complex: Actinomyces viscosus (12).
Microorganisms inhabiting the oral cavity, such as Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroides loescheii, Enterobacteriaceae, Tannerella forsythensis, Centipeda periodontii, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum,11 interact with these sulfur-containing substances, and so produce volatile sulfide compounds (VSC), especially hydrogen sulfide (H S), methyl mercaptan (CH SH), and dimethylsulfide [(CH3)2S].12 These VSC are considered as the main sources of intra-oral OM.8
ICG displayed a strong adhesion to bacterial membranes (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Tannerella forsythia, Camphylobacter recta, Eikenella corrodens and Treponema denticola) and demonstrated bactericidal effect when activated by a diode laser (19-21).
Additionally, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella species, Eikenella corrodens, Peptostreptococcus micros, and Campylobacter rectus are increased in deep periodontal pockets and are implicated as possible periodontopathogens.