EIA

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Related to Eikenella corrodens: Bacteroides corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida, Kingella kingae

EIA

abbreviation for
(Veterinary Science) equine infectious anaemia
References in periodicals archive ?
Cultures of presacral fluid revealed a polymicrobial flora including Escherichia Coli, Enterococcus, Bacillus species and Eikenella Corrodens.
In the pediatric (Milwaukee) group, these concomitantly cultured organisms included Aspergillus fumigatus, Eikenella corrodens, Haemophilus influenzae, Peptostreptococcus spp, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae.
Most microorganisms involved in these disease are gramnegative bacilli, anaerobes (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus) or capnophiles (Aggregatibacterium actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, Capnocytophaga ochracea .
Also, preeclamptic women were more likely to have Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, and Eikenella corrodens, known periodontal pathogens, compared to normotensive women.
Staphylococcus, Enterococcus species, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas species, unusual gram negative bacteria, and the HACEK organisms (Haemophilus aphorphilus, Haemophilus paraphrophilius, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Cardioacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) have been shown to be present in endocarditis and may play a role in vascular inflammation as well.
Purulent material was drained and cultured revealing Eikenella corrodens.
anginosus (found in 52% of patients), Staphylococcus aureus (30% of patients), Eikenella corrodens (30% of patients), Fusobacterium nucleatum (32% of patients), and Prevotella melaninogenica (22% of patients), the investigators reported (Clin.
9,10) The anaerobe Eikenella corrodens is frequently isolated in head and neck infections and is becoming increasingly resistant to clindamycin.