elite

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e·lite

or é·lite (ĭ-lēt′, ā-lēt′)
n. pl. elite or e·lites or élite or é·lites
1.
a. A group or class of persons considered to be superior to others because of their intelligence, social standing, or wealth: "Auguste Comte ... believed that in the age of science society should be ruled by an elite of scientists" (Lewis A. Coser).
b. A member of such a group: "Elites don't grant us [sociologists] interviews. They don't let us hang out at their country clubs" (Sudhir Venkatesh).
c. The best or most skilled members of a group: the elite of professional tennis.
2. A size of type on a typewriter, equal to 12 characters per linear inch.

[French élite, from Old French eslite, from feminine past participle of eslire, to choose, from Latin ēligere; see elect.]

e·lite′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

elite

(ɪˈliːt; eɪ-) or

élite

n
1. (sometimes functioning as plural) the most powerful, rich, gifted, or educated members of a group, community, etc
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) Also called: twelve pitch a typewriter type size having 12 characters to the inch
adj
of, relating to, or suitable for an elite; exclusive
[C18: from French, from Old French eslit chosen, from eslire to choose, from Latin ēligere to elect]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•lite

or é•lite

(ɪˈlit, eɪˈlit)

n.
1. (often used with a pl. v.) the choice or best of a group, class, or the like.
2. (used with a pl. v.) persons of the wealthiest class.
3. a group of persons exercising authority within a larger group.
4. a 10-point type widely used in typewriters and having 12 characters to the inch. Compare pica 1.
adj.
5. of the best or most select.
[1350–1400; Middle English elit a person elected to office < Middle French e(s)lit past participle of e(s)lire to choose < Vulgar Latin *exlegere, for Latin ēligere; see elect]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elite - a group or class of persons enjoying superior intellectual or social or economic status
upper class, upper crust - the class occupying the highest position in the social hierarchy
elect, chosen - an exclusive group of people; "one of the elect who have power inside the government"
cream, pick - the best people or things in a group; "the cream of England's young men were killed in the Great War"
clerisy, intelligentsia - an educated and intellectual elite
beau monde, bon ton, high society, smart set, society - the fashionable elite
few - a small elite group; "it was designed for the discriminating few"
aristocracy, nobility - a privileged class holding hereditary titles
technocrat - an expert who is a member of a highly skilled elite group
Adj.1.elite - selected as the best; "an elect circle of artists"; "elite colleges"
selected - chosen in preference to another
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

elite

noun
1. aristocracy, best, pick, elect, cream, upper class, nobility, gentry, high society, crème de la crème (French), flower, nonpareil a government comprised mainly of the elite
aristocracy rabble, dregs, hoi polloi, riffraff
adjective
1. leading, best, finest, pick, choice, selected, elect, crack (slang), supreme, exclusive, privileged, first-class, foremost, first-rate, pre-eminent, most excellent the elite troops of the President's bodyguard
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

elite

or élite
noun
2. The superlative or most preferable part of something:
Idioms: cream of the crop, flower of the flock, pick of the bunch.
adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نُخْبَه، صَفْوَه
elita
elite
elit
úrval; heldra fólk
elita
seçkin sınıf

elite

élite [eɪˈliːt]
A. Nélite f
B. CPD [group, unit, force] → de élite; [school, university] → de élite, exclusivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

elite

élite [ɪˈliːt]
adj [group] → d'élite; [athlete, player, team] → d'élite; [troops] → d'élite; [institution] → prestigieux/euse
n
the elite → l'élite f
the political elite → l'élite politique
the ruling elite → l'élite dirigeante
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

elite

n (often pej)Elite f
adjElite-; elite groupElitegruppe f, → Elite f; elite unitEliteeinheit f; elite forceElitetruppe f; elite troopsElitetruppen pl; an elite group of scholarseine Elite der Gelehrten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

élite

[eɪˈliːt] nélite f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

élite

(eiˈliːt) , ((American) i-) noun
(with the) the best or most important people especially within society.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
| Brett Bulmer hit an overtime winners as Fife won 4-3 at Guildford in ice hockey's Eilte League.
Eilte Island Resorts Elite Island Resorts Offers Special MotherOs Day Rates .
(31.) "[S]chon verschwand sie hastig bis zu den Knien in den Gummistiefeln und eilte durch den Schlamm des Radiumbades dem unteren Bahnof zu, in seufzendes Selbstgesprach vertieft, in Anfeuerungsrufe, Beschworungsverse, wahrend die eiskalten Wasserbatzen auf ihre Augapfel klatschten.