mindset

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mind·set

or mind-set  (mīnd′sĕt′)
n.
1. A fixed mental attitude or disposition that predetermines a person's responses to and interpretations of situations.
2. An inclination or a habit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mindset - a habitual or characteristic mental attitude that determines how you will interpret and respond to situationsmindset - a habitual or characteristic mental attitude that determines how you will interpret and respond to situations
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

mindset

or mind-set
noun
The thought processes characteristic of an individual or group:
Idiom: what makes someone tick.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a measure of what is called the Einstellung effect, which describes rigid thought patterns that prevent more adaptive solutions to problems, often found right "under the nose." (7) The two experiments used in this study (one involving experienced meditators and a control group of nonmeditators, and the other involving two groups of nonmeditators, one that had gone on a mindfulness retreat and one that had not) demonstrated that the meditators in both experiments had significantly lower mental rigidity than the nonmeditators.
'The Einstellung Effect' occurs when the first idea that comes to mind prevents a better solution being found.
Human nature, driven by the 'einstellung effect' (the tendency to rely on proven solutions, even in the face of knowing about better or more appropriate options; Bilalic et al., 2008), also tends to settle for, or have subsequent questing pursuit for innovative solutions mediated by, the first satisficing solution.