Einthoven


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Einthoven

(Dutch ˈɛɪnthoːvə)
n
(Biography) Willem. 1860–1927, Dutch physiologist. A pioneer of electrocardiography, he was awarded the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1924
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Noun1.Einthoven - Dutch physiologist who devised the first electrocardiograph (1860-1927)
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ECG electrodes (Ag/AgCl) were attached to the participant's right and left ankles, and to the wrist of the non-dominant hand, based on the Einthoven's II derivation.
At the beginning of the 20th century, in 1903 during the first experiments by Willem Einthoven with the use of the electrocardiograph, an effective clinical diagnosis was developed [1].
Lead II can be achieved in the Wistar rat by placement of the negative electrode near the right shoulder and the positive electrode to the left of the xyphoid space, in the same way as the Einthoven triangle (right arm position in the negative electrode and left leg position in the positive electrode).
Holland physiologist Willem Einthoven developed the electrocardiogram (EKG) in 1903, and tireless efforts of Paul Dudley White finally led to its acceptance in American medical practice.
Since the invention of the electrocardiogram (ECG) by Willem Einthoven in 1903, medical science has made tangible progress in the study of heart diseases, including cardiac events prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and risk assessment.
In 1905, a Dutch physician, Wilhem Einthoven, performed an early form of telemedicine by transmitting electrocardiogram data from a distance, and in 1924, Hugo Gernsback invented a "fantasy" telemedicine tool with robotic fingers and a projected video to remotely examine patients.
The ECG electrodes were placed on the body with Einthoven triangular forms to acquire lead-II derivation.
Since the invention of the Einthoven rules, it has been used as a diagnostic feature to identify electrical propagation of cardiac muscles, which means that it has valuable information regarding cardiac situation of a patient.
For obtaining a standard bipolar lead ECG, needle electrodes were attached intramuscularly in a modified Einthoven lead system.
The electrocardiogram (ECG) was first described in early XX century by Einthoven. Together with X-rays, this technology launched a new era of diagnostic possibilities, based on greater objectivity.