Ekaterinoslav


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Related to Ekaterinoslav: Dnipropetrovs'k, Dnjepropetrovsk

Ekaterinoslav

(Russian jɪkətɪrinaˈslaf)
n
(Placename) the former name (1787–96, 1802–1926) of Dnepropetrovsk
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651 file 269180 (3); The Canadian High Commissioner, London, to Emanuelovich Vangeroff, and Aaron Solomonovich Abramovitch, Ekaterinoslav, Bazamya Ulitsa, Dom Vengherova, Russia, 20 July 1906.
In the mid-century, and against the backdrop of the Great Reforms, one of the most important tasks of "learned Jews" was to carry out "inspection trips." Such investigational trips took place in a number of provinces, including Mogilev, Novorossiia, Bessarabiia, Ekaterinoslav, Poltava, and Kiev provinces.
In 1921, the Electrical Engineering Department of the reorganized Ekaterinoslav Polytechnic Institute was attached to the Mechanical Engineering Faculty of the Ekaterinoslav Mining School.
Many Mennonites--including Johann Esau, the former mayor of Ekaterinoslav (now Dnepropetrovsk), and Heinrich Ediger, a Mennonite publisher and former Danish consul in Berdjansk--were able to leave Ukraine.
These migrants arrived from the least ethnically integrated region of the European part of the Russian Empire, which was incorporated in the late eighteenth century, namely the Belarusan provinces of "Grodno, Minsk, Vilna, Vitebsk, and Mogilev" and the Ukrainian provinces of "Podolia, Volhynia, Kiev, Chernigov, Poltava, Kharkov, Kherson, Taurida, and Ekaterinoslav," along with the "Khotin District of Bessarabia Province."
(8.) Dnipropetrovsk (Ekaterinoslav) in Ukraine and Krasnodar (Ekaterinodar) in Southern Russia.
Author Jane Yolen uses poetry in "Ekaterinoslav: One Family's Passage to America" to trace her family's roots from Eastern Europe to America, touching on what drove them from their homeland, and how the supposed land of milk and honey was anything but.
The enthusiasm for the new regime voiced so passionately by Berkman and Goldman was acted on by a legion of activists from anarchist groups as members of military-revolutionary committees in Orel, Odessa, Tula, Smolensk, Ekaterinodar and Ekaterinoslav, some of whom had already been at work in these organisations during the tenure of the Provisional Government.
Arbatov, "Ekaterinoslav, 1917-1922 g.g.," in Arkhiv russkoi revoliutsii, ed.