Elamite

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Related to Elamites: Mesopotamia, Medes

E·la·mite

 (ē′lə-mīt′)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Elam.
2. The language of the ancient Elamites, of no known linguistic affiliation.

Elamite

(ˈiːləˌmaɪt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) an inhabitant of the ancient kingdom of Elam
2. (Languages) Also called: Elamitic or Susian the extinct language of this people, of no known relationship, recorded in cuneiform inscriptions dating from the 25th to the 4th centuries bc
3. (Historical Terms) Also called: Elamitic or Susian the extinct language of this people, of no known relationship, recorded in cuneiform inscriptions dating from the 25th to the 4th centuries bc
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to Elam, its people, or their language

E•lam•ite

(ˈi ləˌmaɪt)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of ancient Elam.
2. the extinct languageof the Elamites, known principally from texts written in a cuneiform syllabary between the 13th and 5th centuries b.c.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Elam, its people, or their language.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Elamite - a member of an ancient warlike people living in Elam east of Babylonia as early as 3000 BCElamite - a member of an ancient warlike people living in Elam east of Babylonia as early as 3000 BC
Caucasian, White, White person - a member of the Caucasoid race
2.Elamite - an extinct ancient language of unknown affinitiesElamite - an extinct ancient language of unknown affinities; spoken by the Elamites
natural language, tongue - a human written or spoken language used by a community; opposed to e.g. a computer language
References in periodicals archive ?
9 Parthians, and Medes, and Elamites, and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and in Judaea, and Cappadocia, in Pontus, and Asia,
I will not be voting Disy because I don't want to support a party that flirts with extremists, nationalists, rejectionists and Elamites, let alone puts such people on their ballot sheets.
the looting of temple property by neighboring Elamites.
Moreover, the Assyrians' raids, conquests, and excesses made them hated among groups as disparate as Phoenicians, Medes, and, especially, the Elamites. Long allies with Babylon, Elam was the subject of an early version of "a final solution," in which Assyria attempted to wipe the nation, and its people, off the face of the earth, a goal it nearly achieved, halted only by the difficult terrain of the mountains.
"Pinikri" was the great mother of the original Elamites. Others identify her as "Kiririsha", another Elamite goddess.
The various empires--Akkadians, Elamites, Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, and others all--left remnants of their peoples, cultures, and religions.
The city was the capital of the Elamites and subsequently the winter capital of Achaemenians for some 2800 years.
After centuries Sumerians invented cuneiform writing system and then Elamites and Assyrians learned to use this writing system and then Iranians started to use this writing system, but while the Assyrian cuneiform had 700 signs and Elamites cuneiform had 300 signs, Iranian cuneiform had only forty two signs for setting their alphabet.
Parthians and Medes and Elamites, those dwelling in Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya adjoining Cyrene, visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs--we hear them speaking in our own tongues the wonderful works of God." (Acts 2:1-11)
The list of nationalities present at the first assembly reads like a United Nations roll call of the first century: Parthians, Medes, Elamites, Mesopotamians, Jews, Phrygians, Pamphylians, Egyptians, Libyans, Romans, Cretans, and Arabs.
In Jerusalem Peter stood up to announce Jesus' resurrection to "Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs" (Acts 2:8-11).
It was built around 1250 BCE by King Untash-Napirisha, mainly to honor Inshushinak--one of the major gods of the Elamites.