elastic

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Related to Elasticity of demand: Elasticity of supply, Income elasticity of demand

e·las·tic

 (ĭ-lăs′tĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Easily resuming original size or shape after being stretched or otherwise deformed; flexible. See Synonyms at flexible.
b. Relating to a collision in which the total kinetic energy is conserved.
2. Quick to recover, as from disappointment; resilient: an elastic spirit.
3. Capable of being adapted to change or a variety of circumstances: "To say that morale is a highly unscientific and quite elastic concept would be an understatement" (Roger J. Spiller).
4. Economics Of, relating to, or being a good for which changes in price have a large effect on the quantity demanded or supplied.
n.
1.
a. A flexible stretchable fabric made with interwoven strands of rubber or an imitative synthetic fiber.
b. An object made of this fabric.
2. A rubber band.

[New Latin elasticus, from Late Greek elastos, beaten, ductile, variant of Greek elatos, from elaunein, to beat out.]

e·las′ti·cal·ly adv.

elastic

(ɪˈlæstɪk)
adj
1. (General Physics) (of a body or material) capable of returning to its original shape after compression, expansion, stretching, or other deformation
2. capable of adapting to change: an elastic schedule.
3. quick to recover from fatigue, dejection, etc; buoyant
4. springy or resilient: an elastic walk.
5. (Chemistry) (of gases) capable of expanding spontaneously
6. (General Physics) physics (of collisions) involving no overall change in translational kinetic energy
7. (Textiles) made of elastic
n
8. (Textiles) tape, cord, or fabric containing interwoven strands of flexible rubber or similar substance allowing it to stretch and return to its original shape
9. (Textiles) chiefly US and Canadian something made of elastic, such as a rubber band or a garter
[C17: from New Latin elasticus impulsive, from Greek elastikos, from elaunein to beat, drive]
eˈlastically adv

e•las•tic

(ɪˈlæs tɪk)

adj.
1. capable of returning to its original length or shape after being stretched.
2. spontaneously expansive, as gases.
3. flexible; adaptable: elastic rules.
4. bouncy or springy: an elastic step.
5. resilient; buoyant.
n.
6. fabric or material made elastic, as with strips of rubber.
7. something made from this material, as a garter.
[1645–55; < New Latin elasticus expanding spontaneously < Greek elast(ós) (late variant of elatós ductile, beaten (of metal)]
e•las′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.elastic - a narrow band of elastic rubber used to hold things (such as papers) togetherelastic - a narrow band of elastic rubber used to hold things (such as papers) together
band - a thin flat strip of flexible material that is worn around the body or one of the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
elastic device - any flexible device that will return to its original shape when stretched
2.elastic - a fabric made of yarns containing an elastic material
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Adj.1.elastic - capable of resuming original shape after stretching or compression; springy; "an elastic band"; "a youthful and elastic walk"
flexile, flexible - able to flex; able to bend easily; "slim flexible birches"
inelastic - not elastic; "economists speak of an inelastic price structure"
2.elastic - able to adjust readily to different conditions; "an adaptable person"; "a flexible personality"; "an elastic clause in a contract"
adaptable - capable of adapting (of becoming or being made suitable) to a particular situation or use; "to succeed one must be adaptable"; "the frame was adaptable to cloth bolts of different widths"

elastic

elastic

adjective
1. Capable of withstanding stress without injury:
Physics: plastic.
2. Capable of adapting or being adapted:
Translations
مَرِنمَرِن، مُتَمَغِّطمَطّاطمَطَّاط
elastický
elastikelastiskfleksibel
kuminauha
elastika
sveigjanlegurteygjanlegurteygjuband, teygja
弾性ゴム
고무줄
elastingumaselastinisgumelėlankstustamprumas
elastīgsgumijapielāgojamsspējīgs pielāgoties
elastikaprožen
resår
ความยืดหยุ่น
elastikîesneklastiklâstik
chất cao su

elastic

[ɪˈlæstɪk]
A. ADJelástico (fig) → flexible
B. N (in garment) → elástico m, jebe m (S. Cone)
C. CPD elastic band N (esp Brit) → gomita f, goma f elástica

elastic

[ɪˈlæstɪk]
adj
(= stretchy) [material] → élastique; [skin, muscle] → élastique; [dough] → élastique
(= flexible) [policy, idea] → flexible
an elastic interpretation of sth → une interprétation flexible de qch
nélastique m

elastic

adj (lit, fig)elastisch; elastic waistTaille fmit Gummizug
nGummi (→ band nt) m; (US: = rubber band) → Gummi m; a piece of elasticein Gummiband nt

elastic

[ɪˈlæstɪk]
1. adjelastico/a
2. nelastico

elastic

(iˈlӕstik) adjective
1. (of a material or substance) able to return to its original shape or size after being pulled or pressed out of shape. an elastic bandage; Rubber is an elastic substance.
2. able to be changed or adapted. This is a fairly elastic arrangement.
noun
a type of cord containing strands of rubber. Her hat was held on with a piece of elastic.
elasticity (iːlӕˈstisəti) , ((American) ilas-) noun
elastic band (also rubber band)
a small thin piece of rubber for holding things together or in place. He put an elastic band round the papers.

elastic

مَطَّاط elastický elastik Gummi λάστιχο elástico kuminauha élastique elastika elastico 弾性ゴム 고무줄 elastiek strikk guma elástico резинка resår ความยืดหยุ่น lastik chất cao su 弹性织物

e·las·tic

n. elástico, cinta de goma;
a. elástico-a, capaz de extenderse y de volver luego a la forma inicial;
___ tissuetejido ___;
___ stockingmedia ___.

elastic

adj elástico
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We then estimated the own-price elasticity of demand for naloxone purchased at pharmacies (ie, the percentage change in quantity demanded given a one percent increase in the out-of-pocket price), which allowed us to predict the change in total pharmacy naloxone sales following a conversion to OTC, based on different assumptions of changes in demand and price.
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The reduction in supply will reduce quantities and increase prices; which effect predominates depends on the elasticity of demand (see figure 2).
The elasticity of demand growth compared to the growth of gross domestic product keeps on declining.
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Economies with high income elasticity of demand also have high price elasticities, suggesting oil may be capped at $80/b, says analyst.
While there are different approaches to the measurement question, an even more contentious issue concerns the elasticity of demand for imports.
But that's only my initial thoughts we haven't really draft the details and the calculation on the elasticity of demand."