flexion

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flex·ion

 (flĕk′shən)
n.
1. also flec·tion Anatomy
a. The act of bending a joint or limb in the body by the action of flexors.
b. The resulting condition of being bent.
2. A part that is bent.

[Latin flexiō, flexiōn-, a bending, from flexus, past participle of flectere, to bend.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flexion

(ˈflɛkʃən)
n
1. (Physiology) the act of bending a joint or limb
2. (Physiology) the condition of the joint or limb so bent
3. a variant spelling of flection
ˈflexional adj
ˈflexionless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flex•ion

(ˈflɛk ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the act of bending a limb.
b. the position that a limb assumes when it is bent.
2. a bent part.
[1595–1605; < Latin flexiō action of bending]
flex′ion•al, adj.
flex′ion•less, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

flexion

A bending or being bent, as of a joint.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flexion - the state of being flexed (as of a joint)flexion - the state of being flexed (as of a joint)
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
2.flexion - deviation from a straight or normal course
deviation, difference, divergence, departure - a variation that deviates from the standard or norm; "the deviation from the mean"
3.flexion - act of bending a joint; especially a joint between the bones of a limb so that the angle between them is decreased
bending - the act of bending something
flex - the act of flexing; "he gave his biceps a flex to impress the ladies"
dorsiflexion - the act of bending backward (of the body or a body part)
extension - act of stretching or straightening out a flexed limb
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

flexion

[ˈflekʃən] Nflexión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flex·ion

n. flexión, acto de flexionar o de ser flexionado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flexion

n flexión f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
At subsequent follow-ups of 3 months and 12 months, the patient remained asymptomatic with full range of motion and 5/5 strength on testing both elbow flexion and resisted forearm supination.
Comparting the impact of 12 weeks of intervention with swimming on the subjects' physical fitness (Table 1), significant difference was found between pre- and post-test moments for the following tests: sit-to-stand (p = 0.005); elbow flexion (p = 0.007); walk 2.44 m and sit (p = 0.005); walk 6 min.
In this study, where we evaluated the shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscle strengths using HHD and examined their relationship with functional activities, it was determined that there is a negative but significant relationship between the shoulder extension, elbow flexion and supination, and wrist extension muscle strengths and total LEFS score.
Triceps muscle was split and separated bluntly to improve elbow flexion. In some patients, posterior MCL (PMCL) was released to restore elbow ROM.
There was no change in average MRC score following treatment for elbow flexion, shoulder abduction, or wrist extension (see Table 2).
There were statistical differences between sets for elbow flexion (P=0.001), set 1 was higher than set 2 (P<0.020) and set 3 (P<0.01).
Errors were less than 1% for shoulder abduction, 6% for elbow flexion, 7% for hip abduction, and 9% for knee flexion.
Although the FMG sensor was designed to monitor the muscles responsible for finger and wrist movements, structures related to the elbow flexion and forearm pronation, such as the brachioradialis and the pronator teres, respectively, also produce mechanical stimuli due their activation [29], affecting the magnitude and range of the FMG signals related to specific hand poses.
In relation to the weekly frequency, the training protocol was performed three times per week, where eight exercises were performed in LL and UL: sitting leg press, sitting supine, knee extension, pulley (back), lying down knee flexion, low pulley elbow flexion, seated leg press, and pulley elbow extension.
Abnormal coupling between elbow flexion with shoulder abduction and elbow extension with shoulder adduction torques were quantitatively characterized and were one of the main factors related to reaching deficits following stroke [5-7].
The research team induced anatagonist muscle prefatigue by isometric elbow flexion. The influence of the fatigue on the cortico-cortical coupling and central modulation was assessed though the technique of EEG-EEG phase synchronization index.