lithotripsy

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Related to Electrohydraulic Lithotripsy: electrohydraulic lithotripter, Laser lithotripsy

lith·o·trip·sy

 (lĭth′ə-trĭp′sē)
n. pl. lith·o·trip·sies
Pulverization of kidney stones or gallstones by means of a lithotripter.

[litho- + Greek trīpsis, a rubbing, pounding (from trībein, to rub, pound; see lithotripter) + -y.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lithotripsy

(ˈlɪθəʊˌtrɪpsɪ)
n
(Medicine) the use of ultrasound, often generated by a lithotripter, to pulverize kidney stones and gallstones in situ
[C20: from litho- + Greek thruptein to crush]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lith•o•trip•sy

(ˈlɪθ əˌtrɪp si)

n., pl. -sies.
the pulverization of one or more stones in the body by means of a lithotripter.
[1825–35; litho- + Greek trîps(is) rubbing, wear + -y3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

lith·o·trip·sy

, lithotrity
n. litotripsia, trituración de cálculos en el riñón, el uréter, la vejiga y la vesícula biliar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lithotripsy

n litotricia; extracorporeal shock wave — litotricia extracorpórea por ondas de choque
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two prospective randomized trials comparing electrohydraulic lithotripsy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy showed discordant results; Adamek et al.
Almadi, "Efficacy of spyglass-guided electrohydraulic lithotripsy in difficult bile duct stones," Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
This approach permits the use of diverse tools for stone fragmentation including mechanical lithotripters electrohydraulic lithotripsy pneumatic/ ultrasonic lithotripter and laser energy.1 The widely accepted clinical lasers for lithotripsy are the holmium: YAG (Ho:YAG).
Histologically, laser lithotripsy produced complete necrosis of ureteral epithelium with partial necrosis of the lamina propria and muscle as early as Day 0.1 Electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHl) produced total abrasion of the epithelium with edema of the remaining layers by Day 1, and it is believed that EHL has the narrowest margin of safety of all forms of intracorporeal lithotripsy.11 Lithoclast produces the least microscopic and macroscopic damage to the urothelium.10 Some investigators also suggested ESWL be used as the first line of management for ureteric stone but most of the times kidneys are obstructed in most of the cases and stones are impacted.