electron

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Related to Electron mass: speed of light, Planck constant, Joule, Bohr radius

e·lec·tron

 (ĭ-lĕk′trŏn′)
n. Abbr. e
A stable elementary particle in the lepton class having a negative electric charge of 1 elementary unit (about 1.602 × 10-19 coulombs) and a mass of about 9.11 × 10-28 grams. Electrons are found in shells orbiting the nuclei of atoms and can also move freely through space as cathode rays in a cathode-ray tube or as beta particles emitted by radioactive nuclei, or flow in a current through a conducting material impelled by an electric potential difference.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electron

(ɪˈlɛktrɒn)
n
(Atomic Physics) a stable elementary particle present in all atoms, orbiting the nucleus in numbers equal to the atomic number of the element in the neutral atom; a lepton with a negative charge of 1.602 176 462 × 10–19 coulomb, a rest mass of 9.109 381 88 × 10–31 kilogram, a radius of 2.817 940 285 × 10–15 metre, and a spin of
[C19: from electro- + -on]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•lec•tron

(ɪˈlɛk trɒn)

n.
1. an elementary particle that is a fundamental constituent of matter, having a negative charge of 1.602 x 10−19 coulombs, and existing independently or as the component outside the nucleus of an atom.
2. a unit of charge equal to the charge on one electron.
[1891; electr (ic) + -on1, as in ion, cation, anion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·lec·tron

(ĭ-lĕk′trŏn′)
A stable subatomic particle with a negative electric charge. Electrons spin about an atom's nucleus in orbits called shells. Electrons behave both as particles and as waves, and their motion generates electric and magnetic fields. Though the electron is the lightest subatomic particle, its charge is as great as that of a proton. See more at atom.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

electron

1. One of the three basic subatomic particles. It is very light and orbits round the nucleus of an atom. It has a negative charge.
2. A subatomic particle carrying a negative charge.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electron - an elementary particle with negative chargeelectron - an elementary particle with negative charge
delta ray - an electron ejected from matter by ionizing radiation
free electron - electron that is not attached to an atom or ion or molecule but is free to move under the influence of an electric field
lepton - an elementary particle that participates in weak interactions; has a baryon number of 0
photoelectron - an electron that is emitted from an atom or molecule by an incident photon
valence electron - an electron in the outer shell of an atom which can combine with other atoms to form molecules
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إلكترونإلِكْترون
elektron
elektron
elektrono
elektron
elektroni
elektron
elektron
rafeind
電子
전자
elektronaselektronikaelektroniniselektroninis paštas
elektrons
elektron
electrão
electron
elektrón
elektron
elektron

electron

[ɪˈlektrɒn]
A. Nelectrón m
B. CPD electron camera Ncámara f electrónica
electron gun Ncañón m de electrones
electron microscope Nmicroscopio m electrónico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

electron

[ɪˈlɛktrɒn] nélectron m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

electron

nElektron nt

electron

:
electron beam
electron camera
nElektronenkamera f
electron gun
nElektronenkanone f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

electron

[ɪˈlɛktrɒn] nelettrone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

electron

(iˈlektron) noun
a very small particle within the atom.
electronic (eləkˈtronik) adjective
1. worked or produced by devices built or made according to the principles of electronics. an electronic calculator.
2. concerned or working with such machines. an electronic engineer.
ˌelectronic ˈmail noun
(also e-mail, ~email) the system of sending messages by computer; the information sent this way.
electronics (eləkˈtroniks) noun singular
the branch of science that deals with the study of the movement and effects of electrons and with their application to machines etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

e·lec·tron

n. electrón, partícula diminuta de carga eléctrica negativa.
___ beamshaz de electrones.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The significantly smaller electron mass, however, must be compensated for by increasing their energy and therefore inertia to achieve an effect similar to high mass particles.
The electron mobility is inversely proportional to the effective electron mass, and the data derived from two derivation of the band by software are shown in Table 4.
In the present work, however, we will restrict ourselves in the case of light WIMPs with a mass in the region of the electron mass.
Because the mass of the negatively charged electrons, [m.sub.e] = 9.1094x[10.sup.-31] kg, is far smaller than that of the positively charged ions, [m.sub.i], which is tens of the mass of protons, [m.sub.p] = 1836[m.sub.e] = 1.6726x[10.sup.-27] kg, it is reasonable to neglect the electron inertia in the complicated set of the nonlinear Equations (2)~(5) by assuming a zero electron mass. In this case, the dynamics of electrons are neglected and the simplest nonlinear solitary waves are obtained in the IA mode propagating in the direction parallel to the field lines of the external magnetic field, Bext.
The electron effective mass is [m.sup.*.sub.w] = [0.2(1-x)+0.12x][m.sub.0] for [In.sub.x][Ga.sub.1-x]N material and [m.sup.*.sub.b] = 0.2[m.sub.0] for GaN material [21], and [m.sub.0] is the free space electron mass. The band gap energy of ZB [In.sub.x][Ga.sub.1-x]N of indium composition x can be given as follows [21]: [E.sub.g] ([In.sub.x][Ga.sub.1-x]N) = 0.78x + 3.52(1 - x) - 1.4x(1 - x).
Here E, V0, m and a are total energy of particle, barrier height, electron mass and barrier width respectively.
The value of the mass varies according to the relation [m.sup.*.sub.e] = (0,067 + 0,083x)[m.sub.0] where [m.sub.0] is the electron mass in vacuum.
Considering the intensity dependence of electron mass, the relativistic ponderomotive force produced due to laser beam is
The values of electron mass, charge, and wave function, at a given temperature, represent the effective parameters of QED at those temperatures.
Washington, Jan 10 ( ANI ): A research done by University of Arizona astronomy professor found that a popular alternative to Albert Einstein's theory for the acceleration of the expansion of the universe does not fit newly obtained data on a fundamental constant, the proton to electron mass ratio.