electron

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e·lec·tron

 (ĭ-lĕk′trŏn′)
n. Abbr. e
A stable elementary particle in the lepton class having a negative electric charge of 1 elementary unit (about 1.602 × 10-19 coulombs) and a mass of about 9.11 × 10-28 grams. Electrons are found in shells orbiting the nuclei of atoms and can also move freely through space as cathode rays in a cathode-ray tube or as beta particles emitted by radioactive nuclei, or flow in a current through a conducting material impelled by an electric potential difference.

electron

(ɪˈlɛktrɒn)
n
(Atomic Physics) a stable elementary particle present in all atoms, orbiting the nucleus in numbers equal to the atomic number of the element in the neutral atom; a lepton with a negative charge of 1.602 176 462 × 10–19 coulomb, a rest mass of 9.109 381 88 × 10–31 kilogram, a radius of 2.817 940 285 × 10–15 metre, and a spin of
[C19: from electro- + -on]

e•lec•tron

(ɪˈlɛk trɒn)

n.
1. an elementary particle that is a fundamental constituent of matter, having a negative charge of 1.602 x 10−19 coulombs, and existing independently or as the component outside the nucleus of an atom.
2. a unit of charge equal to the charge on one electron.
[1891; electr (ic) + -on1, as in ion, cation, anion]

e·lec·tron

(ĭ-lĕk′trŏn′)
A stable subatomic particle with a negative electric charge. Electrons spin about an atom's nucleus in orbits called shells. Electrons behave both as particles and as waves, and their motion generates electric and magnetic fields. Though the electron is the lightest subatomic particle, its charge is as great as that of a proton. See more at atom.

electron

1. One of the three basic subatomic particles. It is very light and orbits round the nucleus of an atom. It has a negative charge.
2. A subatomic particle carrying a negative charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.electron - an elementary particle with negative chargeelectron - an elementary particle with negative charge
delta ray - an electron ejected from matter by ionizing radiation
free electron - electron that is not attached to an atom or ion or molecule but is free to move under the influence of an electric field
lepton - an elementary particle that participates in weak interactions; has a baryon number of 0
photoelectron - an electron that is emitted from an atom or molecule by an incident photon
valence electron - an electron in the outer shell of an atom which can combine with other atoms to form molecules
Translations
إلكترونإلِكْترون
elektron
elektron
elektrono
elektron
elektroni
elektron
elektron
rafeind
電子
전자
elektronaselektronikaelektroniniselektroninis paštas
elektrons
elektron
electrão
electron
elektrón
elektron
elektron

electron

[ɪˈlektrɒn]
A. Nelectrón m
B. CPD electron camera Ncámara f electrónica
electron gun Ncañón m de electrones
electron microscope Nmicroscopio m electrónico

electron

[ɪˈlɛktrɒn] nélectron m

electron

nElektron nt

electron

:
electron beam
electron camera
nElektronenkamera f
electron gun
nElektronenkanone f

electron

[ɪˈlɛktrɒn] nelettrone m

electron

(iˈlektron) noun
a very small particle within the atom.
electronic (eləkˈtronik) adjective
1. worked or produced by devices built or made according to the principles of electronics. an electronic calculator.
2. concerned or working with such machines. an electronic engineer.
ˌelectronic ˈmail noun
(also e-mail, ~email) the system of sending messages by computer; the information sent this way.
electronics (eləkˈtroniks) noun singular
the branch of science that deals with the study of the movement and effects of electrons and with their application to machines etc.

e·lec·tron

n. electrón, partícula diminuta de carga eléctrica negativa.
___ beamshaz de electrones.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most significant among Sinanoy-lu's theories were "Many Electron Theory of Atoms and Molecules" (1961), "Solvophobic Theory "(1964), "Network Theory" (1974), "Microthermodynamics" (1981) and "Valency Interaction Formula Theory" (1983).
The Electron-Vacuum Coupling Force in the Dirac Electron Theory and its Relation to the Zitterbewegung.
Bohr had foreseen the need for quantum theory when investigating the electron theory of metals for his 1911 doctoral dissertation.

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