carbon

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carbon

a nonmetallic element
Not to be confused with:
carbine – a shoulder rifle with a short barrel
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

car·bon

 (kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

[French carbone, from Latin carbō, carbōn-, a coal, charcoal; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carbon

(ˈkɑːbən)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds)
a. a nonmetallic element existing in the three crystalline forms: graphite, diamond, and buckminsterfullerene: occurring in carbon dioxide, coal, oil, and all organic compounds. The isotope carbon-12 has been adopted as the standard for atomic wt; carbon-14, a radioisotope with a half-life of 5700 years, is used in radiocarbon dating and as a tracer. Symbol: C; atomic no: 6; atomic wt: 12.011; valency: 2, 3, or 4; relative density: 1.8–2.1 (amorphous), 1.9–2.3 (graphite), 3.15–3.53 (diamond); sublimes at 3367±25°C; boiling pt: 4827°C
b. (as modifier): a carbon compound.
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) short for carbon paper, carbon copy
3. (Electrical Engineering) a carbon electrode used in a carbon-arc light or in carbon-arc welding
4. (Electrical Engineering) a rod or plate, made of carbon, used in some types of battery
[C18: from French carbone, from Latin carbō charcoal, dead or glowing coal]
ˈcarbonous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

car•bon

(ˈkɑr bən)

n.
1. a nonmetallic element found combined with other elements in all organic matter and in a pure state as diamond and graphite. Symbol: C; at. wt.: 12.011; at. no.: 6; sp. gr.: (of diamond) 3.51 at 20°C; (of graphite) 2.26 at 20°C.
3. a sheet of carbon paper.
4.
a. the current-bearing carbon rod used in arc lights and in welding.
b. the rod or plate, composed in part of carbon, used in batteries.
[1780–90; < French carbone, coinage based on Latin carbōn-, s. of carbō charcoal]
car′bon•less, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

car·bon

(kär′bən)
Symbol C A naturally abundant, nonmetallic element that occurs in all organic compounds and can be found in all living things. Diamonds and graphite are pure forms, and carbon is a major part of coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Carbon can bond to itself and forms an enormous number of important molecules, many of which are essential for life. Atomic number 6. See Periodic Table.
Did You Know? Proteins, sugars, fats, and even DNA all contain many carbon atoms. The element carbon is also important, however, outside the chemistry of living things. The two most familiar forms of carbon—diamond and graphite—differ greatly because of the arrangement of their atoms. In diamond, each carbon atom bonds to four others in a dense network that makes the material the hardest substance known. But in graphite, each carbon atom bonds only to three others in a much looser arrangement of layers, each of which is weakly bonded to neighboring layers. Because individual layers of carbon in graphite are so loosely connected, they are easily scraped away, which is why it is used as pencil "lead" for writing. In 1985 an entirely new form of carbon was discovered in which carbon atoms join to make a sphere called a buckminsterfullerene or buckyball, after Buckminster Fuller, who created buildings with a similar appearance. Scientists are currently looking for uses for buckyballs and tubes made from them.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.carbon - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamondcarbon - an abundant nonmetallic tetravalent element occurring in three allotropic forms: amorphous carbon and graphite and diamond; occurs in all organic compounds
fullerene - a form of carbon having a large molecule consisting of an empty cage of sixty or more carbon atoms
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
carbon 14, radiocarbon - a radioactive isotope of carbon
char - a charred substance
charcoal, wood coal - a carbonaceous material obtained by heating wood or other organic matter in the absence of air
carbon black, crock, lampblack, smut, soot - a black colloidal substance consisting wholly or principally of amorphous carbon and used to make pigments and ink
activated carbon, activated charcoal - powdered or granular carbon used for purifying by adsorption; given orally (as a slurry) it is an antidote for some kinds of poisons
black lead, graphite, plumbago - used as a lubricant and as a moderator in nuclear reactors
coal - fossil fuel consisting of carbonized vegetable matter deposited in the Carboniferous period
adamant, diamond - very hard native crystalline carbon valued as a gem
limestone - a sedimentary rock consisting mainly of calcium that was deposited by the remains of marine animals
crude, crude oil, fossil oil, petroleum, rock oil, oil - a dark oil consisting mainly of hydrocarbons
2.carbon - a thin paper coated on one side with a dark waxy substance (often containing carbon); used to transfer characters from the original to an under sheet of paper
paper - a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
3.carbon - a copy made with carbon paper
copy - a thing made to be similar or identical to another thing; "she made a copy of the designer dress"; "the clone was a copy of its ancestor"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
koolstof
كربونكَرْبُونكربون، فَحْم
въглеродкопие
carboni
uhlíkkopírákuhlí
kulstofcarbonkarbonkul
karbono
süsisüsinik
کربن
hiilihiilidioksidikopsu
कार्बन
ugljikugalj
szén
carbon
karbon
kolefni
炭素
탄소
carbonium
angliskalkėkopijaanglies dvideginisanglies viendeginis
ogleklisogle
കാര്‍ബണ്‍
koolstofkoolstofdioxidekool
carbon
uhlík
ogljik
ugljenikугљеник
kolkoldioxid
kaboni
คาร์บอน
вуглець
cacboncácbongiấy thanthanthan củi

carbon

[ˈkɑːbən]
A. N
1. (Chem) → carbono m
2. (Elec) → carbón m
3. (= carbon paper) → papel m de calco, papel m carbón, papel m carbónico (S. Cone)
B. CPD carbon copy N (typing) → copia f hecha con papel de carbón (fig) → vivo retrato m
he's a carbon copy of my unclees el vivo retrato de mi tío, es calcado a mi tío
carbon credit Ncrédito m de carbono
carbon dating Ndatación f utilizando carbono 14
carbon dioxide Nbióxido m de carbono
carbon fibre Nfibra f de carbono
carbon monoxide Nmonóxido m de carbono
carbon paper Npapel m de calco, papel m carbón, papel m carbónico (S. Cone)
carbon ribbon Ncinta f mecanográfica de carbón
carbon tetrachloride Ntetracloruro m de carbono
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

carbon

[ˈkɑːrbən] ncarbone m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

carbon

n (Chem) → Kohlenstoff m; (Elec) → Kohle f

carbon

:
carbon copy
nDurchschlag m; to be a carbon of somethingdas genaue Ebenbild einer Sache (gen)sein; she’s a carbon of her sistersie sieht ihrer Schwester zum Verwechseln ähnlich
carbon dating
carbon dioxide
nKohlendioxid nt
carbon fibre
nKohlenstoffaser f

carbon

:
carbonless paper
nselbstdurchschreibendes Papier
carbon monoxide
nKohlenmonoxid nt
carbon paper
nKohlepapier nt
carbon ribbon
nKohlefarbband nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

carbon

[ˈkɑːbən] n (Chem) → carbonio (also carbon paper) → carta carbone
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

carbon

(ˈkaːbən)
an element occurring as diamond and graphite and also in coal etc.
carbon copy
a copy of writing or typing made by means of carbon paper.
carbon dioxide (daiˈoksaid)
a gas present in the air, breathed out by man and other animals.
carbon monoxide (məˈnoksaid)
a colourless, very poisonous gas which has no smell. Carbon monoxide is given off by car engines.
carbon paper
a type of paper coated with carbon etc which makes a copy when placed between the sheets being written or typed.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

carbon

كَرْبُون uhlík kulstof Kohlenstoff άνθρακας carbono hiili carbone ugljik carbonio 炭素 탄소 koolstof karbon węgiel carbono углерод kol คาร์บอน karbon cácbon
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

car·bon

n. carbono;
___ dioxidedióxido de ___;
___ monoxidemonóxido de ___;
___ tetrachloridetetracloruro carbónico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

carbon

n (element) carbono; — dioxide dióxido de carbono; — monoxide monóxido de carbono; — tetrachloride tetracloruro de carbono
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.