elenctic


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elenctic

(ɪˈlɛŋktɪk) or

elenchic

adj
(Logic) logic refuting an argument by proving the falsehood of its conclusion. Compare deictic1
References in periodicals archive ?
13; Richard Baxter, A Holy Commonwealth, or, Political Aphorisms, Opening the true Principles of Government (London: Thomas Underhill and Francis Tyton, 1659), 317-20; Francis Turretin, Institutes of Elenctic Theology, 3 vols.
Death appears to result in Socrates returning to an underworld agora for no divine revelations, but merely the rewards of more elenctic philosophizing.
Peterson's book addresses a familiar puzzle in Platonic scholarship: in dialogues such as the Apology and Euthyphro, the depicted Socrates disavows wisdom and avoids advancing views of his own, focusing instead on elenctic examination of his interlocutors' positions.
The question I want to pose here, then, is one that students do not fail to raise when they first encounter this text: What exactly is it that Socrates desires from this bizarre exchange with Euthyphro, and from the elenctic game of 'giving and asking' more generally?
demonstrates the relationship between exegesis, doctrine, elenctic, and praxis in the doctrine of God espoused in his Theoretico-practica theologia.
Brisk Socratic dialogues": Elenctic rhetoric in Joseph Heller's Something Happened.
The focus here is upon Francis Turretin's magnum opus', originally published in 1679-85 as Institutio theologiae elencticae, which appears in English translation as Institutes of Elenctic Theology, 3 vols.
concentrates on the influence of dialogue, both catechistic in The Shorter Catechism of the Presbyterian Church and elenctic in the Socratic tradition.