basking shark

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Related to Elephant shark: tiger shark, Zebra shark, Elephant fish, basking shark

bask·ing shark

(băs′kĭng)
n.
A very large shark (Cetorhinus maximus) that measures up to about 12 meters (40 feet) in length, feeds on plankton, and often floats near the surface of the water.

basking shark

n
(Animals) a very large plankton-eating shark, Cetorhinus maximus, often floating at the sea surface: family Cetorhinidae. Also called: sailfish

bask′ing shark`

(ˈbæs kɪŋ, ˈbɑ skɪŋ)
n.
a large shark, Cetorhinus maximus, of cold and temperate seas, that often swims slowly or floats at the surface.
[1760–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.basking shark - large harmless plankton-eating northern sharkbasking shark - large harmless plankton-eating northern shark; often swims slowly or floats at the sea surface
mackerel shark - fierce pelagic and oceanic sharks
Cetorhinus, genus Cetorhinus - comprising only the basking sharks; in some classifications considered the type genus of a separate family Cetorhinidae
Translations
requin pèlerin

basking shark

nRiesenhai m

basking shark

[ˈbɑːskɪŋˈʃɑːk] nsqualo elefante
References in periodicals archive ?
That makes the elephant shark the slowest-evolving vertebrate known to man
The elephant sharks (Callorhinchus mili), although not a shark but a member of the branch of cartilaginous fish known as chimaeras, have hardly changed for 420 million years, genome mapping studies have showed.
9 ( ANI ): A team of researchers has sequenced the genome of the elephant shark, a curious-looking fish with a snout resembling the end of an elephant's trunk.
A comparison of the elephant shark genome with human and other vertebrate genomes revealed why the skeleton of sharks consists entirely of cartilage instead of bones.
These amazing pictures show how the 12-foot basking shark, also called the elephant shark or bone shark, got into trouble near Clare Island, Co Mayo.
A type of fish called an elephant shark that is popularly used in New Zealand for fish and chips is "a very distant relative of humans," the University of Otago said in (http://www.
The gene family may have very ancient roots, as a partial and-like sequence appears in the genome of the elephant shark, which evolved 450 million years ago and is part of the oldest living family of jawed vertebrates.
Washington, March 18 (ANI): Scientists have discovered that the elephant shark, a primitive deep-sea fish that belongs to the oldest living family of jawed vertebrates, can see color much like humans can.