ivory

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i·vo·ry

(ī′və-rē, īv′rē)
n. pl. i·vo·ries
1.
a. A hard, smooth, yellowish-white substance composed primarily of dentin that forms the tusks of the elephant.
b. A similar substance forming the tusks or teeth of certain other mammals, such as the walrus.
2. A tusk, especially an elephant's tusk.
3. An article made of ivory.
4. A substance resembling ivory.
5. A pale or grayish yellow to yellowish white.
6. ivories
a. Music Piano keys.
b. Games Dice.
c. Slang The teeth.
adj.
1. Composed or constructed of ivory.
2. Of a pale or grayish yellow to yellowish white.

[Middle English ivorie, from Old French ivoire, ivurie, from Latin eboreus, of ivory, from ebur, ebor-, ivory, from Egyptian 3bw, elephant, ivory; see elephant.]

ivory

(ˈaɪvərɪ; -vrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Zoology)
a. a hard smooth creamy white variety of dentine that makes up a major part of the tusks of elephants, walruses, and similar animals
b. (as modifier): ivory ornaments.
2. (Zoology) a tusk made of ivory
3. (Colours)
a. a yellowish-white colour; cream
b. (as adjective): ivory shoes.
4. a substance resembling elephant tusk
5. an ornament, etc, made of ivory
6. (Historical Terms) black ivory obsolete Black slaves collectively
[C13: from Old French ivurie, from Latin evoreus made of ivory, from ebur ivory; related to Greek elephas ivory, elephant]
ˈivory-ˌlike adj

Ivory

(ˈaɪvərɪ)
n
(Biography) James. born 1928, US film director. With the producer Ismael Merchant, his films include Shakespeare Wallah (1964), Heat and Dust (1983), A Room With a View (1986), and The Golden Bowl (2000)

i•vo•ry

(ˈaɪ və ri, ˈaɪ vri)

n., pl. -ries,
adj. n.
1. the hard white substance, a variety of dentine, composing the main part of the tusks of the elephant, walrus, etc.
2. this substance when taken from a dead animal and used to make articles and objects.
3. an article made of this substance, as a carving or a billiard ball.
4. matter or a material resembling or imitating this substance, esp. vegetable ivory.
5. the tusk of an elephant, walrus, or other animal.
6. Slang. a tooth.
7. ivories, Slang.
a. the keys of a piano or similar instrument.
b. dice.
8. a creamy or yellowish white.
adj.
9. consisting or made of ivory.
10. of the color ivory.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French ivurie < Latin eboreus (adj.), derivative of ebor-, s. of ebur ivory]
i′vo•ry•like`, adj.

i·vo·ry

(ī′və-rē)
The hard, smooth, yellowish-white substance forming the teeth and tusks of certain animals, such as the tusks of elephants and walruses and the teeth of certain whales.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ivory - a hard smooth ivory colored dentine that makes up most of the tusks of elephants and walrusesivory - a hard smooth ivory colored dentine that makes up most of the tusks of elephants and walruses
tusk - a long pointed tooth specialized for fighting or digging; especially in an elephant or walrus or hog
dentin, dentine - a calcareous material harder and denser than bone that comprises the bulk of a tooth
2.ivory - a shade of white the color of bleached bonesivory - a shade of white the color of bleached bones
whiteness, white - the quality or state of the achromatic color of greatest lightness (bearing the least resemblance to black)

ivory

adjective
Of a light color or complexion:
Translations
slonovinaslonovinový
elfenbenelfenbens-
norsunluunorsunluinen
slonovačabjelokost
elefántcsont
fílabein
象牙
상아
ebur
dramblio kaulas
ziloņkauls
ivoorivoorkleurivoren
slonovinaslonovinový
slonova kostslonovina
slonovača
elfenben
งาช้าง
fildişifildişinden yapılmış
ngà

ivory

[ˈaɪvərɪ]
A. Nmarfil m ivories (= teeth) → dientes mpl (Mus) → teclas fpl (Billiards) → bolas fpl
to tickle the ivoriestocar el piano
B. ADJ [cane, box] → de marfil; [skin] → de color marfil
C. CPD Ivory Coast NCosta f de Marfil
ivory hunter Ncazador (a) m/f de marfil
ivory tower N (fig) → torre f de marfil

ivory

[ˈaɪvəri]
n
(= tusk) → ivoire m
(= colour) → ivoire m
adj (= colour) → ivoire inv
an ivory silk wedding dress → une robe de mariage ivoire, en soie
modif [handle, key] → en ivoire; [carving] → sur ivoire

ivory

n
(also colour) → Elfenbein nt; the ivory tradeder Elfenbeinhandel
(inf) ivories (= piano keys)Tasten pl; (= billiard balls)Billardkugeln pl; (= dice)Würfel pl; (dated: = teeth) → Beißer pl (inf)
adj
(colour) → elfenbeinfarben

ivory

[ˈaɪvrɪ]
1. navorio
2. adj (colour) → avorio inv; (object) → d'avorio

ivory

(ˈaivəri) noun, adjective
(of) the hard white substance forming the tusks of an elephant, walrus etc. Ivory was formerly used to make piano keys; ivory chessmen.

ivory

عَاجٌ slonovina elfenben Elfenbein ελεφαντόδοντο marfil norsunluu ivoire slonovača avorio 象牙 상아 ivoor elfenben kość słoniowa marfim слоновая кость elfenben งาช้าง fildişi ngà 象牙
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This growing body of work starts by acknowledging that most entrepreneurs have experience working in other organizations prior to founding a new firm (Dobrev & Barnett, 2005; Freeman, 1986; Sorensen & Fassiotto, 2011) and builds on the recognition that some firms generate more entrepreneurs than others (Burton, Sorensen, & Beckman, 2002; Elfenbein, Hamilton, & Zenger, 2010; Gompers, Lerner, & Scharfstein, 2005; Klepper & Sleeper, 2005; Sorensen, 2007a).
Blumenbouquet, Osterreich, um 1810, Elfenbein, Mikroschnitzerei, 25 x 20 cm (Rahmen) / Flowerbouquet, Austria, c.
La relacion positiva entre estas dos variables viene defendida por varios investigadores, entre otros (Orlitzky, Schmidt, y Rynes, 2003; Allouche, y Laroche, 2005; Wu, 2006; Margolis, Elfenbein, Walsh, 2007).