eliminative materialism

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eliminative materialism

or

eliminativism

n
(Philosophy) (in philosophy of mind) the theory that people's common-sense understanding of the mind is false and that certain classes of mental states that most people believe in do not exist
References in periodicals archive ?
In an earlier paper the author argued that deflationism is preferable to fictionalism as an alternative to both traditional realism and eliminativism.
Essentially, eliminativism is the claim that denies the existence of some type of thing in the world.
The big problem with Incomplete Nature is that it systematically avoids engaging its only real empirical competitor, some kind of interpretivism or eliminativism.
Semantic Eliminativism, and the 'Theory'-theory of Linguistic Meaning", en: Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary v.
The main claim of restrictivism is that there is no cognitive phenomenology, and so what we are looking at is a form of cognitive phenomenology eliminativism.
The author has organized the main body of his text in seven chapters focused on aisthesis, the consequences of panpsychism, panpsychism and eliminativism, the universe of things, and other related subjects.
we might think of it as a kind of eliminativism, since it denies the
There is little room here for radical eliminativism about the mind, nor are more extreme versions of anti-representationalism given much page time.
For instance, he tries to engage in the philosophical debate about eliminativism, the view that all mental phenomena are explained by brain phenomena without any emergent properties at the mental level.
More importantly, Repetti's claim about excessive eliminativism misrepresents Goodman's argument.
Given that starting point, reductionism and eliminativism are bound to seem the only serious options and "emergentism" a dodge.
Searle first contrasts his own anti-dualist approach, which he calls "biological naturalism", to the two forms of materialism, namely reductionism and eliminativism, of which he says: