elliptical clause


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elliptical clause

A clause in which something is omitted, usually because it is understood. In the sentence “If in doubt, check the manual.” “If in doubt” is an elliptical clause, with words such as “you are” omitted.
References in periodicals archive ?
With my master's degree in English, I plan my days around showing others the breathing imagery of Zora Neale Hurston and explaining the masquerade of the verbal phrase and the fickleness of the elliptical clause.
7) However, it can also be read as containing an elliptical clause of comparison and understood to mean, roughly, "like a person who.
In several passages the phrase has a quite different meaning, and in most of these instances it is clearly to be understood as containing an elliptical clause of comparison.
When in Chaucer as [s]he that contains an elliptical clause of comparison, the suppressed verb is usually a form of "to do" or "to be," and the following that introduces a new subordinate clause.
16) One passage in which as [s]he that contains an elliptical clause of comparison does have a near-parallel in Boccaccio:
Recognizing the elliptical clause of comparison, we receive a different first impression: Criseyde is alone and fearful, resembling a woman who does not know what to do.