elliptical clause

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elliptical clause

A clause in which something is omitted, usually because it is understood. In the sentence “If in doubt, check the manual.” “If in doubt” is an elliptical clause, with words such as “you are” omitted.
References in periodicals archive ?
This elliptical phrase was assumed to refer to a Taiwan Strait crisis, but the two governments, and most especially Tokyo, were reluctant to be explicit and risk offending China -- or alert the Japanese public to the potential risks attendant to a cross-strait contingency that involved the U.
Clearly, materiality and thing-ness is important in Syers's work, so it is crucial that a printed version of her play have the deeply struck, handsome serif font on each page, listing the "Card Catalog Headings Pertaining to Montgomery Park" or elliptical phrases like "What's illimitable is its brightness.
168-93), McDonald upholds Buckingham's speech, without further examination, as a "showcase for the late Shakespearean style, displaying most of its hyperbatonic properties: intrusions, elliptical phrases, embedded clauses, loose connections among grammatical elements, regular enjambment, numerous light and weak endings, playfulness with caesurae, stops near the end of the line, all this amounting to a kind of jagged music, but music nonetheless" (138).