em dash

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Related to Em dashes: en dashes

em dash vs. en dash

There are two similar but distinct punctuation marks called dashes: the en dash () and the em dash (). In appearance, an en dash is slightly longer than a hyphen ( - ), approximately the width of a capital N, while an em dash is slightly longer than an en dash, approximately the width of a capital M (hence their names).
When we refer to dashes, we are usually referring to em dashes, as they are the more common punctuation mark of the two. However, it’s important to know the different ways that each mark is used.
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em·dash

or em dash  (ĕm′dăsh′)
n.
A symbol ( — ) used in writing and printing to indicate a break in thought or sentence structure, to introduce a phrase added for emphasis, definition, or explanation, or to separate two clauses.

[From its being the width of an m in printing.]

em dash

(ˈɛmˌdæʃ) or

em rule

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a dash (—) one em long

em′ dash`


n.
Print. a dash one em long.

em dash

, en dash - The em dash is the long dash used in punctuation whose length is based on the width of the letter M; the en dash is shorter (the width of an N) and the hyphen is even shorter.
See also related terms for punctuation.
Translations

em dash

[ˈemdæʃ] N (Typ) → raya f
References in periodicals archive ?
Once I locked in on the difference between en dashes, hyphens, and em dashes, I found that, as with other roles in MLA, the satisfaction comes from working with gifted colleagues who generously give of their time and expertise, in this case for the excellence of its premier journal Notes.
Rob Einsle's debut novel punishes the delicate craft of the Beat Generation by blending surrealism with mercilessly employed hard rhymes, em dashes, horrendous cliches, and random, cut-up words from a thesaurus to deliver a tale of greed, self-discovery, sex, friendship, drugs and murder.
Here, however, the style plods, plagued by idiosyncrasies, chief among them a tendency to punctuate questions with periods and statements with question marks, an overreliance on em dashes to fracture sentence structure, and irregular constructions.