emblematist

Related to emblematist: emblematic

emblematist

(ɛmˈblɛmətɪst)
n
a person who designs emblems

emblematist

a person who makes or designs emblems, as for heraldic display or other purposes.
See also: Honors and Regalia
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References in periodicals archive ?
12) He composed this moralistic volume under the influence of his friends Pierio Valeriano, a classicist and emblematist who wrote Hieroglyphica (Venice, 1556), (13) and Francesco Colonna, a Dominican poet who composed the mysterious allegorical tome, the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (Venice, 1499).
The second reading of the iris as the "radiant and refulgent Bow of Heaven" (Holtgen 92) remained commonplace enough in the early modern period for Henry Hawkins, a Jesuit emblematist, to adapt the image for its religious symbolism in his Partheneia Sacra (1633) (Holtgen 92-9), indicating that both Catholics and Protestants could fashion long-standing Biblical symbols to connote unity, pardon, and "the reconciliation given to the human race by God" (Ferguson, "Rainbow" 43).
Thus, because God was an emblematist engaging in the creative use of metaphor, Agamben can see how "according to the implicit wisdom of the emblematic project, this displacement is also a token of redemption, this unlikeness a superior likeness," metaphor's perceivable, liberating potential (143).
These two streams of danse macabre inheritance--the artistic and the quasi-ecclesiastical--find perfect confluence in the work of the sixteenth-century Dutch emblematist, Hans Holbein the Younger, whose danse macabre woodcuts with their weighty religious epigrams in Imagines Mortis combine an exquisite artistry with clear religious intention.
Observing the rival status of Mary Stuart and Elizabeth Tudor as objects of royal panegyric across the confessional divide, Shell focuses her attention on two less well known cultural instances of vexed and tactically ambiguous loyalty, the Petrarchan verse of Elizabethan diplomat and Catholic poet Henry Constable, and the imprese designed by secular priest and emblematist Thomas Wright for the Earl of Essex's presentation at the 1595 Accession Day tilts.
Moreover, in a final chapter Bath extends his study through the eighteenth century to the Romantics and manages in the process to unearth some remarkable connections between the early nineteenth-century emblematist, John Thurston, and William Blake.
Junius was a versatile man, a physician, classical scholar, translator, lexicographer, antiquarian, historiographer, emblematist, school rector, and Latin poet as well--a man with a real 'kaleidoscopic scholarship.
Gabor Tuskes discusses the relations between Sambucus, the Hungarian humanist and emblematist, and Geffrey Whitney, who borrowed heavily from his Emblemata (1564) for A Choice of Emblemes (1586).
Hooft (focusing on his humanist art of imitatio) while Frans Blom discusses the emblematist and politician Jacob Cats (documenting his lifetime's engagement with the Essais, starting with "Sur des vers de Virgile").
Adages culled from Plautus are included in several early editions, and that of the Italian-Hungarian humanist and emblematist Giovanni Sambuco (Ioannes Sambucus), produced in 1568, groups the sayings under such topics as marriage and the passions, aiming to support his claim for Plautus's moral wisdom in the face of those detractors who claimed that he preached immorality.
She sees herself as special in this light; referring to her meeting with Georgette de Montenay, the celebrated Protestant emblematist, Charlotte notes how unusual it is, indeed, to be a woman writer: "She is really a virtuous woman, and she has even written a few things.
Wolfe marshals an impressive array of evidence to demonstrate the widespread tendency among translators, commentators, mythographers, polemicists, emblematists, dramatists, and visual artists to interpret aspects of Homer's epics as having rich and ineluctable contemporary resonance.