Embothrium


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embothrium

(ɪmˈbɒθrɪəm)
n
(Plants) any evergreen shrub of the genus Embothrium, esp E. coccineum, native to South America but widely cultivated as an ornamental for its scarlet flowers: family Proteaceae. Also called: Chilean firebush
[C19: from em- + Greek bothrion small pit (referring to its anthers)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Embothrium - small genus of South American evergreen shrubs or small trees with long willowy branches and flowers in flamboyant terminal clusters
dicot genus, magnoliopsid genus - genus of flowering plants having two cotyledons (embryonic leaves) in the seed which usually appear at germination
family Proteaceae, protea family, Proteaceae - large family of Australian and South African shrubs and trees with leathery leaves and clustered mostly tetramerous flowers; constitutes the order Proteales
Chilean firebush, Chilean flameflower, Embothrium coccineum - grown for outstanding display of brilliant usually scarlet-crimson flowers; Andes
References in periodicals archive ?
Nectarivoria y polinizacion por aves en Embothrium cacenieum (Proteceae) en al bosque templado del sur de Chile.
Free radical-scavenging activity of sequential leaf extracts of Embothrium coccineum.
It holds the National Collections of magnolia, eucryphia, embothrium and various rhododendrons.
Wrth gyrraedd y fan hon dyma weld fod llwyn tan Chile (Embothrium coccineum; Chilean firebush) wedi dechrau blodeuo a hynny'n gynnar iawn.
Or what about Embothrium coccineum, the Chilean fire bush, so called for its dazzling display of showy orange flowers?
The Patagonian Forests is characterized by a humid and temperate climate, with vegetation dominated by trees such as Nothofagus (southern beeches in the Nothofagaceae, formerly in Fagaceae), Austrocedrus chilensis (Cupressaceae), Embothrium coccineum, Lomatia hirsuta (Proteaceae), and an understory dominated by a shade-tolerant bamboo Chusquea culeou (Poaceae, Bambusoideae; Burkart et al., 1999).
Subtribe Embothriinae comprising Embothrium, Telopea, Alloxylon and Oreocallis is recognised with some confidence in the fossil record because its pollen has the synapomorphy of spinulate sculpturing (Feuer, 1990; Weston & Crisp, 1994; Barker et al., 2007).
With a distribution of this kind, it is understandable that there are nemoral (woodland) species associated with the rain forests, such as the Chilean firebush (Embothrium coccineum), that grow in the so-called Valdivian forests, and the well-known Asiatic and Australian genus Grevillea.