embryo

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em·bry·o

 (ĕm′brē-ō′)
n. pl. em·bry·os
1.
a. The collection of cells that has developed from the fertilized egg of a vertebrate animal, before all the major organs have developed.
b. A collection of such cells of a human, especially from implantation in the uterine wall through the eighth week of development.
2. Botany The young sporophytic plant contained within a seed or an archegonium.
3. An organism at any time before full development, birth, or hatching.
4. A rudimentary or beginning stage: an idea that was the embryo of a short story.

[Medieval Latin embryō, from Greek embruon : en-, in; see en-2 + bruein, to be full to bursting.]

embryo

(ˈɛmbrɪˌəʊ)
n, pl -bryos
1. (Zoology) an animal in the early stages of development following cleavage of the zygote and ending at birth or hatching
2. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) the human product of conception up to approximately the end of the second month of pregnancy. Compare fetus
3. (Botany) a plant in the early stages of development: in higher plants, the plumule, cotyledons, and radicle within the seed
4. an undeveloped or rudimentary state (esp in the phrase in embryo)
5. something in an early stage of development: an embryo of an idea.
[C16: from Late Latin, from Greek embruon, from bruein to swell]
ˈembryˌoid adj

em•bry•o

(ˈɛm briˌoʊ)

n., pl. -os,
adj. n.
1. an animal in the early stages of development in the womb or egg; in humans, the stage approximately from attachment of the fertilized egg to the uterine wall until about the eighth week of pregnancy. Compare fetus, zygote.
2. the rudimentary plant usu. contained in the seed.
3. the beginning or rudimentary stage of anything.
adj.
4. embryonic.
[1580–90; < Medieval Latin embryō, s. embryōn- < Greek émbryon=em- em-2 + -bryon, derivative of brýein to be full, swell, teem with (compare brýon catkin)]

embryo-

a combining form representing embryo: embryology.
Also, esp. before a vowel,embry-.

em·bry·o

(ĕm′brē-ō′)
1. An animal in its earliest stages of development, especially in the uterus of female mammals, or, in egg-laying animals, an animal developing in the egg until it is hatched.
2. A plant in its earliest stages of development, especially the miniature, partially developed plant contained within a seed. When conditions are right for germination, the embryo begins to grow and bursts through the seed coat.

embryonic (ĕm′brē-ŏn′ĭk) adjective

embryo


click for a larger image
1. A plant or animal that is at an early stage of its development.
2. A young animal in an early phase of development. In humans the phase lasts from the third through the eighth week after fertilization.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.embryo - (botany) a minute rudimentary plant contained within a seed or an archegoniumembryo - (botany) a minute rudimentary plant contained within a seed or an archegonium
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
2.embryo - an animal organism in the early stages of growth and differentiation that in higher forms merge into fetal stages but in lower forms terminate in commencement of larval lifeembryo - an animal organism in the early stages of growth and differentiation that in higher forms merge into fetal stages but in lower forms terminate in commencement of larval life
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
blastosphere, blastula - early stage of an embryo produced by cleavage of an ovum; a liquid-filled sphere whose wall is composed of a single layer of cells; during this stage (about eight days after fertilization) implantation in the wall of the uterus occurs
gastrula - double-walled stage of the embryo resulting from invagination of the blastula; the outer layer of cells is the ectoderm and the inner layer differentiates into the mesoderm and endoderm
morula - a solid mass of blastomeres that forms when the zygote splits; develops into the blastula
umbilical, umbilical cord - membranous duct connecting the fetus with the placenta

embryo

noun
1. foetus, unborn child, fertilized egg The embryo lives in the amniotic cavity.
2. germ, beginning, source, root, seed, nucleus, rudiment The League of Nations was the embryo of the UN.

embryo

noun
A source of further growth and development:
Translations
جَنينفي طَوْر الجَنين، في المَرْحَلَةِ الأولى
embryofosterfoster-i sin vorden
embrió
á frumstigifósturvísir; plöntufóstur, kím
embriologasembriologijaembriologinisembrionasembrioninis
embrija-embrijsiedīgļa-iedīglissākuma stadija
embryo
başlangıçembriyonoğulcuk

embryo

[ˈembrɪəʊ]
A. Nembrión m (fig) → germen m, embrión m
in embryoen embrión
B. CPD [research] → embrionario

embryo

[ˈɛmbriəʊ]
n
(BIOLOGY) [human, animal] → embryon m
human embryo → embryon m humain
mouse embryo → embryon m de souris
frozen embryo → embryon m congelé
(fig)embryon m
in embryo → à l'état d'embryon
modif
embryo screening → tri m génétique des embryons humains
embryo transfer → transfert m d'embryon
embryo cloning → clonage m d'embryon

embryo

nEmbryo m; (esp fig)Keim m; in embryo (lit, fig)im Keim; (animal) → als Embryo

embryo

[ˈɛmbrɪˌəʊ] n (also) (fig) → embrione m
in embryo → in embrione

embryo

(ˈembriəu) nounplural ˈembryos
1. a young animal or plant in its earliest stages in seed, egg or womb. An egg contains the embryo of a chicken; (also adjective) the embryo child.
2. (also adjective) (of) the beginning stage of anything. The project is still at the embryo stage.
ˌembryˈology (-ˈolədʒi) noun
the science of the formation and development of the embryo.
ˌembryoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ˌembryˈologist noun
ˌembryˈonic (-ˈonik) adjective
in an early stage of development.

em·bry·o

n. embrión;
fase primitiva de desarrollo del ser humano desde la concepción hasta la séptima semana;
organismo en la fase primitiva de desarrollo;
___ transfer after vitro fertilizationtransferencia de un___ logrado después de fertilización artifícial.

embryo

n (pl -os) embrión m
References in periodicals archive ?
If organisms that hatch earlier find enough food, they are more likely to grow faster and survive to reproduce, because of the shorter period of embryonic life. The shortening of embryonic development will depend on that temperature that accelerates the embryonic metabolism but at the same does not produce a physiological damage in hatchlings.
You see, testes form early in embryonic life a few weeks after conception.
Umblical hernia appears if complete failure of closure without narrowing of large umbilical opening of early embryonic life occurs.
It occurs because of failure of caudal migration of scapula during early embryonic life resulting in scapula that remains in neck or high up in thorax.
Our patient had no Mullerian-derived organs such as uterus and fallopian tubes, which implies that during early embryonic life, there were viable testicles to produce AMH and cause the regression of the Mullerian-system and that the testes regressed later for unknown reasons.
SINGAPORE, May 20, 2016 - (ACN Newswire) - Researchers at A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) have developed advanced microscopy technologies to monitor embryo development in real time, revealing how mammalian cells differentiate during the earliest stages of embryonic life. These findings, coupled with the novel imaging technique, hold great potential in shaping how assisted reproduction procedures such as In-Vitro Fertilisation (IVF)[1] and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD)[2] are performed, and making these procedures more effective.
The cancer cells, Zon said, resemble embryonic life. The next step is understanding what might trigger the epigenetic change -- whether it results from something specific, like inflammation or UV exposure, or whether it's up to chance.