emergence

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Related to Emergent property: Emergent phenomena

e·mer·gence

 (ĭ-mûr′jəns)
n.
1. The act or process of emerging.
2. A superficial outgrowth of plant tissue, such as the prickle of a rose.

emergence

(ɪˈmɜːdʒəns)
n
1. the act or process of emerging
2. (Botany) an outgrowth, such as a prickle, that contains no vascular tissue and does not develop into stem, leaf, etc

e•mer•gence

(ɪˈmɜr dʒəns)

n.
1. the act or process of emerging.
2. an outgrowth on the surface of a plant.
3. the appearance of new properties or species in the course of evolution.
[1640–50; < French < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emergence - the gradual beginning or coming forth; "figurines presage the emergence of sculpture in Greece"
beginning - the event consisting of the start of something; "the beginning of the war"
rise - a growth in strength or number or importance
2.emergence - the becoming visible; "not a day's difference between the emergence of the andrenas and the opening of the willow catkins"
beginning - the event consisting of the start of something; "the beginning of the war"
eruption - the emergence of a tooth as it breaks through the gum
dissilience - the emergence of seeds as seed pods burst open when they are ripe
3.emergence - the act of emerging
appearance - the act of appearing in public view; "the rookie made a brief appearance in the first period"; "it was Bernhardt's last appearance in America"
4.emergence - the act of coming (or going) out; becoming apparent
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
surfacing - emerging to the surface and becoming apparent
emission, emanation - the act of emitting; causing to flow forth

emergence

noun
1. coming, development, arrival, surfacing, rise, appearance, arising, turning up, issue, dawn, advent, emanation, materialization the emergence of new democracies in Central Europe
2. disclosure, publishing, broadcasting, broadcast, publication, declaration, revelation, becoming known, becoming apparent, coming to light, becoming evident Following the emergence of new facts, the conviction was quashed.

emergence

noun
The act of coming into view:
Translations
بُروز، ظُهور
opdukkentilsynekomst
emergenssiesille tuleminenilmaantuminen
felbukkanás
framkoma, uppkoma
vynorenie
nastanekpojavitev
belirmeortaya çıkma

emergence

[ɪˈmɜːdʒəns] Naparición f

emergence

[ɪˈmɜːrəns] n
[new nation] → naissance f; [industry] → apparition f; [religion, movement] → émergence f
the emergence of sb as sth → l'émergence de qn comme qch
(= coming out) (from house, building) [person] → apparition f

emergence

nAuftauchen nt; (of new nation etc)Entstehung f; (of theory, school of thought)Aufkommen nt

emergence

[ɪˈmɜːdʒns] n (of new ideas, theory) → apparizione f; (of submarine) → emersione f; (of nation) → nascita

emerge

(iˈməːdʒ) verb
1. to come out; to come into view. The swimmer emerged from the water; He was already thirty before his artistic talent emerged.
2. to become known. It emerged that they had had a disagreement.
eˈmergence noun
eˈmergent adjective
being in the process of emerging or developing. the emergent nations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Focusing on the reproductive biology of a female in relation to her environment, her mates, her offspring, and other females, they illustrate the female perspective in a variety of contexts as reproduction is an emergent property of genes, tissues, environment, and evolution.
Rather than posit additional primary pragmatic processes, they aim to show that the existing resources of PPA and relevance theory are sufficient to solve the emergent property problem.
It is probably best to think of end-user data as an emergent property of digital media and networks, one that we have to invest in now, well before we can neatly articulate business plans and ROI projections," Esposito said.
This trajectory is an emergent property with its own rules of operation that are not predictable from the laws that govern the laminar flow of the wind, because the turbulence that governs the formation of the tornado is well-known form of chaotic dynamics that is defined by the fact that its behavior is not predictable from the laws of laminar flow.
To speak of the soul as though it were a mere epiphenomenon of nature, an emergent property, does not allow it to be the informing principle of a living being--something required for an adequate understanding of what it means to be a living being.
The recent airworthiness directive order of inspection, expedited by European Aviation Safety Agency to the entire fleet of Airbus A380 jets, due to brackets that connect the aluminum skin of the A380's enormous wings to its structural ribs, is an example of an emergent property that jeopardizes Airbus operations of the A380 line of production.
The second part turns to complex systems and understanding consciousness as an emergent property.
This emergent property of inductive scenarios makes them desirable for innovation and design activities.
An emergent property of the national economy is one that cannot readily be reduced to the properties of individual market actors, transactions, or provincial markets.
Instead, human nature is an emergent property that cannot be explained by evolutionary psychology.
Thus, as an emergent property of FoL, the power teaching prototype suggested three factors that might frame education at Edward Waters College (EWC) in Jacksonville, Florida.
Emergentism" is discussed in several places, though without any clear metaphysical exposition on just what it means for "Y" to be an emergent property or consequence of "X".